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MUSIC, AMBIENCE AND SOUND ART => Other Ambient (and related) Music => Topic started by: ffcal on July 23, 2015, 12:03:38 PM

Title: Have artisan releases jumped the shark?
Post by: ffcal on July 23, 2015, 12:03:38 PM
A year or two ago, I thought it was cool that a number of microlabels like Fluid Audio and Time Released Audio were releasing their music in elaborate handmade packages with maps and other unusual ephemera.  Now I'm beginning to wonder if the underlying music has become too incidental to the releases themselves.  Over time I've become less enthusiastic about the music, while the packaging has become increasingly elaborate.  Should I be really be jumping at the opportunity to buy a release that comes with flea market photos and fragments of old maps that come in glassine bags that are more appropriate for stamp collecting?

Forrest
Title: Re: Have artisan releases jumped the shark?
Post by: drone on on July 23, 2015, 02:05:47 PM
Yes I've noticed this too.  What gets me is all the fancy packaging yet they still put the music on a cheap CDR.  In general, there are too many releases.  Too many artists/labels don't know how to self-edit.  I find myself buying stuff for the limited edition aspect rather than the music.  Which is pretty dumb.
Title: Re: Have artisan releases jumped the shark?
Post by: petekelly on July 24, 2015, 03:02:39 AM
Forrest,

Is this a case of artists / labels trying to 'add value' to their releases in an increasingly digital world ? If so, I think that's cool, but it goes without saying that the music should be able to 'speak for it itself', primarily.
Title: Re: Have artisan releases jumped the shark?
Post by: ffcal on July 24, 2015, 08:29:41 AM
Forrest,

Is this a case of artists / labels trying to 'add value' to their releases in an increasingly digital world ? If so, I think that's cool, but it goes without saying that the music should be able to 'speak for it itself', primarily.

I was thinking of small labels that seem to have built their following on elaborate packaging, like Fluid Audio.  I guess you could make the argument about the proliferation of expanded editions generally, but I think that has more to do with labels trying to find a formula that keeps them afloat in the era of streaming.

I find myself buying stuff for the limited edition aspect rather than the music.  Which is pretty dumb.

Yeah, I'm guilty of that, too.