[ Hypnos Forum ]

OTHER THINGS IN THE WORLD THAN MUSIC => Everything and Nothing => Topic started by: stargazer on March 12, 2018, 01:09:41 PM

Title: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on March 12, 2018, 01:09:41 PM
A world full oblivion.

How I grow older and wiser, I experience different shades within the shades. Sometimes I am lightweight like a bird of the skies.
Sometimes I am devastated when I see a tree in its full life to be amputed to its bones by stupid people, only to give it a last week before felling.
This tree must have been 100 years old.

There was someone who planted this tree, and watched him growing. Now the one is maybe gone and another one decides to fell a 100 year old entity.
I love every tree, every animal. The pigeons in the city are called rats. Pigeons are so sprightly birds. They reminds me to cats sometimes.
The rats are tiny or really big, just as different as humans. But it is my view. Or is it a forgotten or never lived view?

Attention and mindfulness to one another, a rare thing? Skin-deep soul searching for nothing, reality?
Sometimes I would be a Samurei, and I fight against the oblivion. Sometimes I would be the bird of the skies and glide over them.
Sometimes I realize that how I get older and wiser, the shades within the shades deepend.
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on March 13, 2018, 01:30:57 AM
The human condition, a constant balance between positive and negative....

Sometimes I remember that there must have been more acts of creation, harmony, pleasure, love, connection - if there had been more of the other sort we would no longer be here....

But it is sometimes hard to remember and hold to that...
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: FabioKeiner on March 13, 2018, 07:14:10 AM
never take refuge nowhere but inside of yourself
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: petekelly on March 13, 2018, 07:50:59 AM
Yes Jana, we live in increasingly God-less times (and I'm not referring to any concept of orthodox religion, there), the pursuit of Mammon is engulfing us.
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on March 13, 2018, 12:22:02 PM
Thanks all for your statements. Very much appreciated.

Today I wanted to take a photo of the tree, and while I was gazing at the tree, a neighbour watched me. So I asked her about the tree's destiny.
She said the owner of the house had changed and he had decided to ampute the branches because of an infestation.

Actually for the last 5 years she cared for the tree. So she is absolutely saddened because the tree was riddiciously amputed by the new owner.
She also said the tree could have healed itself. The good news is, the tree won't be felled, and so we hope it will be alive and green again in spring.

We also saw a bird returning to the tree first time, actually they all have left. Tommorrow I will take the picture.
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Scott M2 on March 13, 2018, 09:57:03 PM
I'm glad to hear the good news about this tree.  >*<
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on March 14, 2018, 02:00:29 AM
Nice to hear the positive news

It can depend enormously on the species of tree....

In the UK there are ancient coppices (trees cut down to just a little above the ground), which if managed well last many years longer than if the trees were never touched by human hand. It is part of the complex interactions between humans and nature that can have positive aspects - the cycle of growth and cutting allows wood for human use (was very important in supplying firewood and shelter when there were not too many of us) and maintains a habitat for wildlife that would eventually be taken over by full forest.

(http://www.mast-producing-trees.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/coppice.jpg)

(http://www.hampshirechestnut.co.uk/uploads/1/9/4/0/19404961/3945276_orig.jpg)

Pollarding is when the trees are cut to a height that is higher than coppicing - can often look like an outstretched hand
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRORyAXmxXicZ-KaiHsIiUxMA34QpoOfOqydaxxaFQT7Fa4m4eF7w)

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQiFd9LnIAVT4ETiOFqmOgWznNilqM5ZXYXONVxT06Vsao8VI0L-A)

(http://gb.fotolibra.com/images/previews/449067-beech-tree-epping-forest.jpeg)

Some trees - against a 'common sense' understanding - do thrive when treated this way. London Plane trees can easily survive a severe cutting back which would just kill many other species.

Look forward to the photo.
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on March 14, 2018, 02:40:16 PM
Thanks for the positive resonance and the information about coppicing and pollarding. The other day I thought about that we humans are just like a natural catastrophe.
Like thunder, lightning and storm, we destroy, and like the ashes after fire are the ground for new growing, we humans seed and reforest.

So today I made the photo of our amputed chestnut tree. I searched my ipod for old photos of the castanea and found two shoots from our window.
You can see the castanea behind our tree across the street behind the house. It is as tall as the house itself.

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea1.JPG) (http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea2.JPG)

Now it looks this way (reduced to half of the height of the house):

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea3.JPG) (http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea4.JPG)

Also in a neighbourstreet we have three amputed chestnut trees:

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea5.JPG) (http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea6.JPG)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on March 15, 2018, 01:44:00 AM
That is quite a severe cut back - but the tree does have the chance to flourish in a different way - often when cut back like that it gives a 'starting' point to future cuts.

Lime trees also seem to manage such cut backs, they have a lot of 'epicormic' growth - which means they can bud from the trunk/bark and well as branch tips.
(http://www.ashwoodtreecare.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/pollarding.jpg)

This is a nice webpage: http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20151118-11-legendary-trees-to-celebrate-national-tree-week   which includes pictures of stunning trees - including a 2,000 year old coppice....

I have been through periods when I feel we are not even as pleasant as storms etc - at least they are natural events. Now I tend to see us as 'impacters' (a little like beavers do) - we affect and impact the environment around us as part of our 'natural' essence. The question is more about what sort of impact we choose to have......


Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Julio Di Benedetto on March 15, 2018, 06:10:47 AM
Very interesting thread......it started sad with the apparent demise of a tree and already there is new life within the thread itself.

I grew up in the UK, mostly in the countryside, Yorkshire and the north, Berkshire and Gloucestershire in the south.  The landscape, woods etc were all for the most part pastoral.  It never occurred to me that the beauty of it was not create by nature but by human design.

In American there is not much that I would call pastoral, though there is plenty of farmlands.  Here there is wilderness and that for the most part means trees, dense trees that go out and on for hundreds of miles. Human interaction wth the wilderness usually is the felling of trees to make way for "development" or straight up timber for consumption.  Certainly there are parks to protect, immense ones that rival the size of some countries. 

There is quite an abrupt division between urban/suburban and wilderness.  There seems to be no middle ground.  I don't recall this in Europe.  The human foot print quickly disappears here and one is left with the raw beauty that sometimes can be a challenge to survival in extreme case.  Perhaps it is this complete immersion that is the appeal and draws us into the untouched wilds

I have hiked in these expansive forests and I found that the endless density actually became claustrophobic.  Natures design is utility.....whatever can reach up to the light does so regardless. Its interesting how here you go hiking whereas in the Uk one goes for a walk.

Ultimately I prefer the pastoral landscape that I grew up with and the trees with space so this human can marvel at their individual splendor.

I think I just went completely off topic...well, meandered. :)

 
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on March 15, 2018, 08:42:16 AM
Not off topic, but exploring connected paths.

I worked in a north wales forest of 500 acres of ancient and semi natural woodland - was a stunning experience. I met the same snake shedding it's skin in the same place 3 years running - felt to be an honour. Planted lots of trees as well...
(http://www.hawardencommunitycouncil.gov.uk/Hawarden-CC/UserFiles/Images/hccwebsite055.jpg)

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/6a/fc/aa/6afcaae24e2ea5ead37d1fc5d25ded3a--woods-my-photos.jpg)

Then I lived opposite Cader Idris where I got to know the local farmers and was allowed to wander pretty much anywhere I wanted, including off the paths and found many secluded nooks and cranny's.
(http://www.landscapephotographyuk.com/img/s/v-3/p479924866-4.jpg)

Currently I go wandering around a small local area of hill, stream and woodland. I don't go 'hiking' as I like to spend time in different areas, getting to know the cycles of the plants etc - wondering why adjacent fields have different flowers, finding the quiet places where rare flowers grow. Sitting quietly enough for a pair of hares to wander within 4 foot of me.

Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on March 15, 2018, 02:11:08 PM
Thanks for the great pictures and the link to bbc Andy. Ancient nature ...

I love the wild forests, they have sort of natural order. I grew up 50 meters to a forest with oak trees, beech trees, birch trees, pine, fir trees, alder.

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/forest3.JPG)

But one of the cutest moments I had in a reforested forest:

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/forest1.jpg) (http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/forest2.jpg)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Julio Di Benedetto on March 15, 2018, 04:00:32 PM
Seren those photographs are wonderful.....thanks so much for sharing.  What a privilege to have this close to you. And 3 years in in 500 acres of forest....special.

The picture with the bench overlooking the river/estuary is breathe taking. Where is that?.....you mention Cader Idris above the photograph.

Jana seeing those fir/Pine trees reminds me that we have had the same Christmas tree for 3 years now. There is another one that we planted that did not look to good but it came back and now is where it belongs.  Im not into christmas though I was raised with it and it took a fair bit of persuasion to get my wife to break with tradition.  Now we have the smallest unpruned and wild tree as christmas trees go...but its alive!  When the season is over back out into the garden it goes until the following year.

I have always hated dragging a dead Christmas tree to the curb to be picked up like garbage.   
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on March 16, 2018, 01:46:13 AM
My pictures were all gathered from the web.....thanks for the other beautiful pictures.

I was in the forest for 5 years, but met the snake on 3 of them...
Was hard work but stunning. I had a 'tied' cottage for the job - out the door and into the forest - often only saw my direct boss for about 15 minutes a week as we worked in a department of 2 1/2 people......

Cader Idris is on the Mawddach estuary in West wales - slightly to the North on the Coast - Barmouth is on the north side of the estuary at the coast and Fairbourne is on the South side.

The picture is taken from a viewing point on  the 'Panorama walk'. I lived in a 500 year old cottage 700 foot above the estuary about a mile or so further inland from the photo....

Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: petekelly on March 16, 2018, 06:54:57 AM
I love trees and am fortunate to be able to be in woods pretty much every day when I'm out walking the hound. The natural world seems to me to be the 'real' world, as opposed to that increasingly crazy world that we hear about  in the news etc.
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on March 16, 2018, 01:25:05 PM
To live near a forrest is a pleasure Pete. I did in my childhood (as already mentioned above) and this formed my whole life. Everytime I see a tree I am in love with it. I feel so comfortable within trees.
I am glad to have alot of trees in my city. Without I would feel uncomplete. I hope this sounds not too esoteric. But I also think the natural way is a real way.

Julio, christmas trees for sale. I never bought a tree without roots. The last christmas time I bought my little Caucasian fir that is now growing in the garden. I know the Americans are too cheesy at Xmas especially.

Andy, you are blessed to have worked in the forest. It must have been the best time of your life and maybe it still is? Do you have some work there right now?

A zoom into the tree infront of our window:
(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/tree1.JPG)

My Caucasian fir in the garden:
(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/tree2.JPG)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on March 18, 2018, 02:41:42 AM
It was one of the best times of my life, beautiful but hard physical work - never needed a gym or to 'exercise'.
   I was hardy enough to work hard, eat lunch and then have a nap in the snow....wouldn't try it now.

I now work in a hospital - so very different environment. I try to get to my local favourite woodlands as often as I can... 8)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: thirdsystem on March 18, 2018, 09:21:55 AM
Interesting thread. I am also increasingly concerned regarding the state of our world and society. Perhaps things will improve. I doubt it.

Enjoy coppicing my Cornus shrubs when required. Pruning is quite therapeutic and satisfying I find. I have tried to plant native, indigenous shrubs and trees in my new build garden. It has been quite a challenge starting from scratch but just about there now. Favourite trees have to be Rowans. Managed to plant about six different sorbus species .

I live in a very rural location however I like to escape to this wilderness ;

(http://tgos.co.uk/contentAsset/image/e49e44a9-b4ba-4c4f-914c-720c6d786305/firstImage)

Glent Tilt, near Blair Athol. Just a bit up the road from me, try to get up to Highland Perthshire at least twice a year. There are remnants and hints of the ancient Caledonian Forest here. Covered the entire country in ancient times. A lot of work being done to preserve and increase these areas. Itís worth it .........

(https://dimg.visitscotland.com/wsimgs/glen-affric-min_1502943650.jpg)

Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on March 19, 2018, 01:47:08 AM
beautiful looking places too...
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Julio Di Benedetto on March 19, 2018, 07:03:54 AM
Heres a few images I took of a State park thats very close to where I live.  Its very serene but what makes it more so that cannot be known from looking at the images is that a few miles away is an immense super Walmart and all the suburban noise, traffic and chaos that accompanies it.  In the other direction about a 1/2 miles is the intercostal waterway and then the Atlantic ocean.

This place is a strange anomaly because deep within other then a few distant cell phone towers there are no signs or noise of the pandemonium that reigns quite close.

One gets a real sense of a pre historic past as this place has not be touched since mother nature original created it......oh and it does have a few formidable residents such as large Alligators, Wild Boar and Diamond Back Rattlesnakes but you have to go looking or be just unlucky to find them.  People do kayak these waters.


(http://i64.tinypic.com/qz3hfm.jpg)


(http://i63.tinypic.com/105tfe1.jpg)


(http://i67.tinypic.com/5ezr03.jpg)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on March 19, 2018, 11:19:22 AM
Thanks so much for posting your pictures and stories here.

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/tree3.JPG)

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/tree4.JPG)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on June 01, 2018, 05:37:33 AM
How is that tree doing as the spring and summer comes?
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on June 01, 2018, 10:27:29 AM
It is rainy today Andy and I took photos !

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea7.JPG)(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea8.JPG)
(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea9.JPG)(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/castanea10.JPG)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on June 01, 2018, 01:28:57 PM
good to see new leaves - but also !Ouch!  :o
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on June 20, 2018, 12:28:11 AM
I've been reading 'The Overstory' by Richard Powers - highly recommended for nature / tree appreciators.
It carries both the awe and wonder and the concern / stupidity we have been discussing here...
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on September 13, 2018, 12:26:37 AM
How is the tree looking now?
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on September 16, 2018, 05:02:14 AM
Thanks for asking, Andy. The tree is preparing for autumn and first colors on the leaves show up.

Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on September 16, 2018, 11:28:39 AM
I found out recently that a yew tree not far from here has been identified as 5000 years old - will go to visit it sometime soon.... 8)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on September 17, 2018, 10:09:37 AM
5000 years is beyond belief. Please take a photo for us!
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on September 22, 2018, 09:20:30 AM
Well, I went to visit the Yew tree. Was very much a first visit, a sort of introduction and saying hello.

It is an amazing tree - though not in the usual sense of hugeness. It was more a collection of micro ecologies, each deeply connected.
   The split trunk rises up out of the ground, which was covered in a deep layer of fallen yew berries - so many that when I walked out I had to scrape about an inch deep off my shoes and then hose them clean back at home.
   It is possible to walk up and through the gap between the trunks where the original tree centre appears to have turned into soil. There are numerous roots running from both sides interweaving with each other and forming rudimentary steps.
   There are the usual higher branches, many of which, yew like, are skeletal and patterned or twisted.
   There are burls both on the outside of the trunks and within the inner space that are sprouting dense short branches that look more like yew hedges.
   Some of the burls have died and the wood is a mixture of the yellow/brown and green. There are lichens growing in various places.
   In the centre of the trunks the wood is decomposing and some holes are visible through all the layers of wood. In one of the centres is a thick yew root that is clearly feeding another tree somewhere up in the crown area - impossible to tell where the old and newer begin and end.
   There are spaces where spiders webs have clearly been a long time and a profusion of thin and thick dead branches within the crown and central space.

The tree is clearly used by non-Christians, I saw a coin pushed into the dead wood in the centre and a variety of things hung up in the centre.

Here are some photos from the web - I took a few myself but I'm not on any image websites, so if anyone can assist I'll send some pictures over....

(https://www.monumentaltrees.com/db/07/600/07611.jpg)

(https://www.monumentaltrees.com/db/07/600/07608.jpg)

(https://www.monumentaltrees.com/db/07/600/07609.jpg)
Note the root growing up through the centre of the tree.

(https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/media/100821014/st-cynogs-yew-paul-wood-page-image.jpg?cb=-23282368&preset=justified-image-content-block_750w)

(https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/07/07/article-0-1F721F1F00000578-148_634x355.jpg)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on September 22, 2018, 03:02:50 PM
You can send the photos to me: jaja@cyan-music.com
You can also use www.wetransfer.com It is a comfortable service.

It is amazing how you describe the interiour of this ancient entity.
Very much looking forward to your photos.
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on September 27, 2018, 10:11:14 AM
Here are the wonderful photographs of the ancient yew tree. Thanks Andy.

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/yewtree1.jpg)

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/yewtree2.jpg)

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/yewtree3.jpg)

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/yewtree4.jpg)

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/yewtree5.jpg)

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/yewtree6.jpg)

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/yewtree7.jpg)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on September 27, 2018, 11:10:14 AM
Thanks for putting them up for me Jaja.

The camera has adjusted to the light available - given I was inside the canopy it is darker in reality than the pictures suggest...
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on October 29, 2018, 11:22:48 AM
I went back to visit the tree again today with a friend.

The church had some printed information on the tree:
  Not only is everything in the pictures above the same tree - but what I thought was another tree, about 15 foot away is also the same tree....ascertained through DNA testing.
  Both parts of the tree also have distinct male and female sections.
  There is a small area of yellow/gold leaves - that is described as 'the Golden Bough'.

I love this tree (though tree somehow does not do the living being justice) and if it was not in a church graveyard would be climbing it and having picnics under it....
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: hdibrell on October 29, 2018, 05:11:30 PM
 8)
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on October 29, 2018, 10:17:02 PM
Such a great story! Trees are real entities.
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: Seren on May 15, 2019, 01:40:33 PM
Since posting about my visit to the Yew tree I discovered that what I thought was the tree was only half of it - what seems like a second tree is actually another part of the same tree.....

...How is that tree looking this year Jaja?
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: thirdsystem on May 17, 2019, 03:18:09 AM
Great photos of ancient Yew Trees. A real living link to our ancient past. I signed a petition on change.org recently about protecting our ancient Yews here in the UK as there are major concerns with some for the future.

I have visited this auld beauty...

(https://d3teiib5p3f439.cloudfront.net/news/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Photo-1.jpg)

The Fortingall Yew in a secluded glen in Perthshire. At one point reputed to be the oldest living thing in Europe or possibly the world. This is now unlikely, I think that amazing Welsh Yew may be even more ancient.

The legend is that Pontious Pilate was born in Fortingall and played under this tree. Doubtful as the Romans never made it far into Caledonia  ;).

Hereís some more info on this amazing tree. Certainly experienced the ancient presence standing next to this important living thing. Quite humbling.

https://www.thehazeltree.co.uk/2014/03/26/the-fortingall-yew-symbol-of-eternity/
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: petekelly on May 17, 2019, 12:32:23 PM
Great posts fellers !
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on May 23, 2019, 09:29:11 PM
Thank you for your posts, it is great to know that ancient trees will remain.

Andy: The chestnut tree has leaves all over. But in the near they have felled another three chestnuts, we don't know why they did that.
Title: Re: A world full oblivion
Post by: stargazer on June 01, 2019, 03:06:49 PM
The city where I live is located on the valley of a river. The valley is lined with forest hills. Three days ago we were in one of that forest hills above the city.

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/beechforest1.JPG)

A beech forest, young trees.

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/beechforest2.JPG)

It was peaceful there.

(http://www.cyan-music.com/jaja/hypnos/beechforest3.JPG)