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Messages - ffcal

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841
Everything and Nothing / Re: Worlds most expensive musical instrument
« on: March 26, 2008, 07:15:25 PM »
If the thing can play the Rite of Spring, then I'll be impressed.

Forrest

842
Other Ambient (and related) Music / Re: Steve Roach discussion
« on: March 26, 2008, 07:13:58 PM »
I think "drone on" has a legitimate point about the law of supply and demand that hardly warrants a piling on.  Ambient of any sort does not sell in the quantities that it did even just a few years ago.  Retail outlets for ambient music have been disappearing, and I am hardly surprised that Borders, which used to carry Projekt's recordings, is now on the financial brink.  Be thankful that these 80 discs were not buried with the master recordings for "Dream Circle";)

Forrest

843
My guess would be that space music originated with music composed/performed for planetarium shows during the 70s and 80s.  Of course, there were visionary folks such as Stephen Hill who brought the subgenre to the forefront in the mid-to-late 80s.  I remember when he was broadcasting live in the mid-80s and played Robert Rich's music (then on cassette only) on his show.

Forrest

844
Everything and Nothing / Re: What are your plans and goals in 2008?
« on: March 20, 2008, 08:28:49 PM »
Belated congrats, Loren!  I seem to be headed in a different direction this year.  After twelve years slogging away at the same law firm, I've decided (for reasons probably best kept to myself) that I've had enough at the end of this month.  This change was probably long overdue, but I plan to take a bit of time off before moving into something else.  It's actually a pretty liberating feeling.  We'll see how it goes.

Forrest

845
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: March 20, 2008, 08:22:50 PM »
Coppice Halifax - S/T

Just got this in the mail today.  A very nice disc from Brain Grainger of Milieu fame, with equal parts analog drone, pulse and drift, and even occasional unobtrusive melodies for those that miss that sort of thing.  Comes in a very interesting swivel package and an "83" keychain.  On Expanding Electronic Diversity.  Don't know why the run on this is so small (60).  Looks like it's already sold out at the label.

Forrest

846
Everything and Nothing / Re: State of the music business
« on: March 11, 2008, 09:17:26 PM »
I have probably been buying more CDRs than CDs recently, having stumbled upon several groups I've enjoyed on microlabels such as Foxglove that only release on CDR.  I've found that CDRs are less forgiving of surface scratches than CDs.  This may be due to the fact that the CDR "burning" is dye-based, while the digital information on CDs is etched on by manufacture.  The method of storage/packaging may be a key consideration.  Anthony's fine CDRs may be less likely to act up, because they are securely packed in a slimline plastic case.  Some CDRs I've purchased that are packaged in a paper or cardboard sleeve have not fared that well in the scratch department.

Forrest

847
I use canned air to occasionally clean the dust off my CD lens, but only do it when I hear what sounds like a tracking error or skip on the CD.  It does seem to help, as the tracking error usually goes away.

Forrest

848
Iíve had some success with the Adcom GCD-700 5-disc changer, though they donít make it anymore.  My 1st one lasted over 10 years, and I found another on on ebay for about $300.  Rotelís a very good company.  I have a Rotel receiver that has an extremely low noise floor, especially through headphones.

Forrest

849
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: February 24, 2008, 01:15:03 PM »
Some recent netlabel listening:

Intelligent Toys 4 (a varied set; has a great new Esem track)

Lackluster -CDR#2 (a 320 kbps version is available on Archive.org)

Forrest

850
Everything and Nothing / Re: TED Conference video online
« on: February 24, 2008, 01:00:47 PM »
I wish I could attend a TED conference, too.  I first heard Paul Simon speak about it on Charlie Rose, and then one of the conference's founders was on the other night and mentioned the online videos.  Unfortunately, I think that those conferences are by invitation only.  I also think that one point they were charging several thousand dollars just to attend.

Forrest

851
Everything and Nothing / Re: What should a small record label do?
« on: February 24, 2008, 12:51:48 PM »
I have a somewhat pessimistic view of all of this.  I think you will see fewer manufactured CDs by indies over the next few years, and more download only or CDR micro releases because of continuing declining CD sales.  Having entire CDs available for download certainly won't help.  I still buy CDRs, but would be surprised if many them would still play 5-10 years from now.

Forrest

852
Forrest Fang's "Migration"   8)

Hey Brian, that and a buck will get you a cup of coffee, maybe.  You might be better off collecting baseball cards!;)

One of my best friends in college kept all of his vinyl in plastic bags.  It seemed kind of silly at the time, but over the years, it's turned out to be a pretty good idea.  I still have my Meet the Residents album on vinyl, as well as the Zoviet France chipboard LP double (Monomische) and the original 2 LP version of Richard Tinti/Ariel Kalma's "Osmose."  I also have a Church interview LP on Ryko from the late 80s that's sort of nice to have, even though I haven't played it that much.

Forrest

853
Everything and Nothing / Re: Favorite toys from when we were kids
« on: February 21, 2008, 11:14:43 PM »

Forrest I use to enjoy playing all those games as well, did you ever play Risk? I use to play a version of it I called Pacifist Risk.  :o


Yeah, I remember Risk.  Wasn't too great at it, though I remember going after Katchatka and Irkutsk just because they had cool names.  Anyone want a piece of Siberia?;)  Anyone remember the game Concentration?  I think that was a TV show, too.  Another weird board game that popped out my memory was Careers, which I thought was more fun than Life (both of which were more fun than the real thing, unfortunately).

Forrest

854
Everything and Nothing / Re: Favorite toys from when we were kids
« on: February 21, 2008, 11:07:47 PM »
Well, if you're like me, you moved out & your mom sold them in a yard sale for ten cents each...

Can't blame my mom for that one, though I wasn't too happy that she tossed my baseball card collection when I went to college.  Of course, whose mom didn't do that?

Forrest

855
Everything and Nothing / Re: Favorite toys from when we were kids
« on: February 20, 2008, 11:38:09 PM »
Hey, I remember Lie Detector!  I tended to like the "low-tech" games, like Battleship, Life and Stratego.  I also had collection of Hot Wheels--too bad I don't know what happened to them.

Pong was fun, too.  When I bought a used Atari to use for music in the mid-90s, it came with a Pong disk, so I had to play it again, of course.

Forrest

856
Everything and Nothing / TED Conference video online
« on: February 20, 2008, 11:32:46 PM »
I recently started using the video feature of my video iPod and was pleased to discover that the TED conference has posted nearly 200 of its talks online for download.  The quality is wildly variable, but I've enjoyed most of what I've heard/seen so far.  Just finished listening to Barry Schwartz's talk about the "paradox of choice," which I thought was spot on.  Up next:  Malcolm Gladwell and Michael Pollan.  The link is here:

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks

Forrest

857
Very nice.  I like the detuned sound of the piano.  It has a very nostagic feel.

Forrest

858
Everything and Nothing / Re: Vinyl
« on: February 16, 2008, 12:26:47 PM »

No vinyl, but if you love the sound of analog, this Music for Insomniacs series was originally released on cassettes, I believe 7 of them, which included material beyond the 2 CD set on Enigma (which are among the most treasured CDs I own).

Was it a series? I only have one but that was enough for me, dreadful stuff. Personally I thought it should have been called Irritating Music that Will Make You An Insomniac;D .

Ouch!  I kind of like that album, though at times the pieces almost sound like MIDI files.

Hard to imagine Dark Side of the Moon without the stickers and poster that came with the LP.  I just found a copy of Mirror's "Front Row Centre" LP, which has some more great Andrew Chalk artwork that would probably not translate as well as a small CD cover.

Forrest

859
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: February 13, 2008, 09:50:33 PM »
A mixture of things, all of which I'm enjoying quite a bit--

Peter Wright - Red Lion (yes, him again)
Boxhead Ensemble - Quartets (sort of postrock meets chamber ambient, very enjoyable)
Valerio Cosi - The Spiritual Committee
Meursault - Sleeping Debris

Forrest

860
Now Playing / Re: "Classical" Music or Contemporary Composition Listeners?
« on: February 13, 2008, 09:46:56 PM »
I had a pretty heavy dose of the classics when I was growing up.  Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, and a smattering of the contemporary stuff that would creep in when our family would see the LA Philharmonic.  I remember very clearly seeing/hearing a John Cage premiere that was to commemorate the nation's bicentennial.  The piece had about three or four different sections going on at once at different parts of auditorium, and I remember a very old lady near us rolling up her problem and booing loudly.  I also remember putting my hand over the end of her program because I wanted to hear more of the music!  (I had a lot of cheek as a teenager.)  As a teenager, I was also exposed to Bartok (his concerto for orchestra is still one of my favorite works) and Copland (though Appalachian Spring was great, but couldn't get into his serial works), and was also familiar with the progification of some these works through progrock groups like Emerson, Lake & Palmer.  I also remember being introduced to Rachmamninoff's Symphonic Dances from a classmate who now teaches composition at UCLA.

I stuidied a bit of formal classical composition when I went to college and belonged to a collegium, but didn't think I had the discipline or the chops to make a go at a career in classical music.  Probably the most lasting influence from the classical area on my own music came from the minimalists like Steve Reich, Philip Glass and Terry Riley.  Reich's "Music for 18 Musicians" was particularly a revelation to me.  These days, I actually lean more towards stuff that I didn't listen that much when I was younger--baroque music (particularly concernto grossi), Debussy solo piano music and Mozart piano concertos.

Forrest

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