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Messages - mgriffin

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"People are banned too easily?"

I think you'd have a hard time supporting that. This forum has been around for over 15 years and we've only banned a few people, ever, and those bans occurred after numerous warnings, and after the members continued to ignore the warnings and do the same things they had been warned not to do.

I don't claim to have handled this perfectly, as far as deciding when to ban someone, when to warn them, when to delete or edit posts. I can only say we (meaning myself and the admins & moderators as a group) have tried to be fair and impartial.

I apologize for all the times this forum became an unpleasant place to visit because of disruptive behavior. We'll definitely work to minimize that as much as we can.

After discussion among the moderators, I've decided to ban Horizon1982 from the Hypnos Forum.

There have been too many examples over too long a time of bad behavior, warnings being ignored, abuse and insults being posted then deleted.

Yeah, I've had enough.

Warning after warning, constant personal attacks. The moderators spend 90% of our time dealing with just a few people.

Hypnos News and Announcements / Re: Hypnos releases for 2015 ?
« on: May 13, 2015, 08:45:55 AM »
Hi Wanterkeelt

We've talked about plans from time to time but there's nothing wrong asking for an update.

Simply put, I've been a bit slack about pushing forward with new CD projects, though there are several in the queue.

Up next will be the 2nd Seren Ffordd & Oophoi collaboration and our first release by Max Corbacho.

We'd also like to resume our Seren Ffordd reissue series on Hypnos Secret Sounds, though we'll be changing the nature of those editions a little bit.

There's also a new Seren Ffordd solo in the Hypnos pipeline, though I don't want to do too much stuff by a single artist without breaking things up a bit.

I'm also beginning to plan an album of my own, though I'm not sure if I expect this to come out late in 2015 or early in 2016.

Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: Now Reading, pt 2
« on: April 29, 2015, 09:01:38 AM »
That sounds great!

Just what I need, more books to add to my towering "to be read" pile.  ;)

Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: "Mythos and Music"
« on: April 28, 2015, 11:45:02 AM »
Here's a post on my fiction-related blog at recapping the "Mythos and Music" panel, along with photos and videos.

Please note that I didn't try to mention "ambient favorites" (so I did not mention a great deal of ambient music that is very appealing, influential and important to me) but specifically music that evokes a "Lovecraftian" vibe.

Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: Now Reading, pt 2
« on: April 28, 2015, 09:20:22 AM »

I just started reading Vermilion by Molly Tanzer. It's very fun and engagingly strange... here's the way the main character is described by the publisher:

"Gunslinging, chain smoking, Stetson-wearing Taoist psychopomp, Elouise “Lou” Merriwether might not be a normal 19-year-old, but she’s too busy keeping San Francisco safe from ghosts, shades, and geung si to care much about that. It’s an important job, though most folks consider it downright spooky. Some have even accused Lou of being more comfortable with the dead than the living, and, well… they’re not wrong."

I'm seeing the book get a lot of great reviews everywhere from Publishers Weekly and Library Journal to NPR, and I keep thinking "this book needs to be a movie!" I'd really recommend it.

Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: Now Reading, pt 2
« on: April 28, 2015, 09:12:39 AM »
I just picked up a new one from Joe R. Lansdale, Prisoner 489, but I haven't read it yet.

I also have his earlier story collection, By Bizarre Hands, which was recommended to me by a bunch of Lansdale enthusiasts.

Others I see recommended a lot are The Bottoms (which won a bunch of mystery/suspense awards) and the "Hap & Leonard" series (about to become a movie) -- the first Hap and Leonard book is Savage Season.

Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: "Mythos and Music"
« on: April 27, 2015, 10:12:27 AM »
Thanks for the replies, everybody. I was in a hurry this past few days with out-of-town guests visiting for the convention, and of course the convention itself.

The "Mythos and Music" panel discussion ended up being lots of fun. We covered everything from Lustmord and Sleep Research and Endvra, to Metallica, Rudamentari Peni and Portal.

Art and Literature, Movies and TV / "Mythos and Music"
« on: April 23, 2015, 11:19:44 AM »
This weekend Lena and I will be attending CthulhuCon here in Portland - a convention event sort of loosely focused on the work of H.P. Lovecraft, including movies and games inspired by Lovecraft's work, and other writers working in the same general area of cosmic horror.

One event I'll be part of is a panel discussion called "Mythos and Music" where we'll discuss various types of related music. It won't just be about ambient or dark ambient stuff, and will probably focus more on industrial and metal, as there are more examples of that kind of thing actually using words and names directly out of Lovecraft. The other panelists have all different kinds of varied music backgrounds and interests, and are probably even more knowledgeable than I am about songs and albums where recording artists have directly "quoted" from Lovecraft.

My opinion is that it's not terribly interesting if we talk only about artist or bands who make songs named after Lovecraft stories, and much more interesting if we discuss the wider sphere of influence, and that's where dark ambient comes in. Something like Lustmord "feels" a lot like Lovecraft's stories even though Lustmord isn't name-dropping Cthulhu or other details out of Lovecraft's mythos into his work.

I wondered if anybody had any suggestions about what might be covered in a discussion like this?

Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: Now Reading, pt 2
« on: April 23, 2015, 11:13:31 AM »
I really loved Annihilation too, and also felt some similarities with Lost.

Looking forward to the next 2 books.


Disc 2 (Trk 16)
"Las Siete Poderes Africanos"

AP: "The Seven African Powers."  What's that supposed to mean?  This is
another vintage track you and I did back in Frazier Park in '93.  You
even got to show off on a acoustic guitar program I had at the time,
playing parts that physically couldn't be played in the real world
unless they were overdubbed.  What do you think, has the piece held up?

RG: I saw this title on a candle I bought at the grocery store.  The
candles that show different saints!  I later pulled out the old piece,
remixed it, and matched it to the title.  Your rhythm had this Santana
quality to it that fit perfectly with the title.

AP:  So, what are your future plans at this point--future projects?  At one
point, you were going to use the Bone pieces for your next album, and
leading it off with "From the Bottom of the Sea."  Is that still a possibility?

RG: "From The Bottom OF the Sea" will be on my next CD.  I'm also
working on electro-Italian style pieces where I am using my Melodica.
Imagine Kraftwerk, Budd, and Piazzola.  Other styles will include Glass,
Klaus Shulze, Satie, Fripp & Eno, all done Garcia style of course!  I'm
not sure what's happening with Richard's pieces.  Maybe he'll release
it, maybe I will.



Disc 2 (Trk 15)
"From the Bottom of the Sea"

AP: Very nice percussion track--do you recall how you treated it?  Sounds
very Enoesque, like that first track on "Hybrid" with Michael Brooks.
Great groove, but you can't really tell what it is--electronic, acoustic, or both. 
You switched to an organ sound that fades in an out
over the piece.  Do you like using organs much?  Any significance to
the title?  All these tracks were done when you were living in New
Mexico, right?

RG: Lots of treatments on this entire piece.  It's a dedication to my
Uncle Julio who wanted to come back as a dolphin.  It wasn't
really an organ sound but maybe a combination of synth and organ.  The
melody definitely had to be way out there, as Harold would say. 
"Ghost like Melodies" and any possible ocean sounds  I could  find
which I treated, reversed, and sometimes, more reverb on the reverb!


Disc 2 (Trk 14)
La Mesa Terminada"

AP: Another track with Bone--did he give you these two tracks to add to at
the same time, or did this one come later?  What does the title mean
for you?  You've given several pieces on your albums Spanish
titles--any particular reason?  Again, what did Bone provide and what
did you add, besides keyboards and a bass line?

RG:  Richard does everything live. Nothing can be separated which is fine
by me.  He later asked me, how were you able to play
that intro so perfectly?  I told him that I had to count and pray that
I would hit it in two or three takes.  Luckily, I got it on the first
take.  A real one hitter.  "La Mesa Terminada" means "The Finished
Table".  It could have more than one meaning which is
what I like about the title.  I also like the way it flows.


Disc 2 (Trk 13)

AP: When did you start your association with Richard Bone--how did
that evolve?  What did Richard provide you with for this track? 
Besides keyboards (and a bass line?), what else did you add to this
one?  Again, that classic space-Rhodes keyboard sound....

RG: I had just finished unpacking the last box when I believe Richard
called me. We agreed to start working together.  He sent me the grooves
and I did the rest.  It took forever to come up with a piano melody, but
once I found it I couldn't stop it.  Again, this is acoustic piano midi’ed to
two other acoustic piano patches from my synth's.
The piano deserved the biggest, grand sound possible.


Disc 2 (Trk# 8  )

AP: This is somewhat of an unreleased orphan track which I recall you playing me
back in Frazier Park which originally had a working title of "Big Room
Solo."  Scott told me when you used to come down to record at his
studio, you would always say "give me the big room."  Any memories of
this solo piece in particular?

RG: Not one of my favorite pieces.  Too heavy-handed, and too loud.  The
melody is very nice though.  What this piece needs is pure reverb and no
live piano sound.  More big room please!


Disc 2 (Trks 5, 6, 7)
“Five Dreams From Yesterday"
"Two Finger Music"
"Eyes Wander"

AP: “Five Dreams” is a great track off "Lakeland," combining many
elements that worked well in your previous work.  Even the title
sort of recalls a time reference, a vague "Maybe Forgotten Forever" quality.
The beginning drone, the dirge groove--classic Garcia signature stuff.
What brought this one on?  Again, it's got that classic Rhodes EP
sound--with lots of cool backwards sounds in the background (real
backwards tape stuff or from a rackmount?).  A big production track?

RG: There's lots of stacked synth's on this piece.  I then ran the drum
machine through the vocoder and then noticed the vocoder humming it's
own melody.  This helped me create a melody that worked very well. Again,
the piano was midi’ed to the Rhodes.  Those backward sounds that you hear
a series of piano chords recorded on reel to reel and then played
backwards.  I had to use my imagination so the backward chords would
play exactly where I wanted them to.

AP:  "Two Finger Music"--piano solo, big room sound, pretty short track
for you--but somehow it seems complete.  Lots of delays and reverb.  Do
you put delay on before reverb or after?  It always seems to be coming
from another room, or another world....

RG: Sometimes, I'll put just the reverb on two separate tracks so
I can later make a choice of what I want to do. This piece
was composed with my two index fingers. I had some kids recording in
my studio once and I wanted to show them you
don't really have to be a genius or practice for a million hours to
create beautiful music. After shooting my mouth off I then
had to face the music. I showed them my two index fingers and
started to play. The title was obvious. "Two Finger Music."

AP: "Eyes Wander."  Sounds like a Harold title.  Same kind of solo
piano vibe as the last track--big room sound with treatments.  I really
like how you bring in the EP sound at the end--was it in there all
along, and you just added it in at the end, or did you specifically do
that part separately?  It's a great ending to a very lonely track, and
it changes the tone of the piece to even more melancholy, even though
the acoustic piano is still in there somewhere.

RG:  I've never been married, but like most men, their eyes wander at
the mall.  I know mine do, but if you’re with your wife expect to get slapped
when your eyes wander!  I had to cut the beginning because it
was so terrible. The reverb started the piece off and I slowly brought
 the live piano in to a comfortable listening level.

AP:  What's the story with "Lakeland"?  You once had a cassette of
Repetition Repetition called "Lakeland."  What made you want to
revive the title?  You told me once the cover picture was a gift from
some of your Navajo friends in New Mexico....

RG: During one of many fishing trips with my Navajo friends here in
Flag there was one particular lake where you had to be Native American
to go to. The fish were jumping right in front of us but we couldn't
even catch a cold that day.  Twelve hours later after being eaten alive by
mosquitoes and gnats, the lake turned magical.  I took several shots of
the lake and you'll notice the trees on the back cover which is my back
yard. I superimposed the trees and clouds at a later date. The title
was easy since "Lakeland" was only a cassette and the music had already
been recorded. All I had to do is match the two.


Disc 2 (Trks 1, 6, 8)
"I Can Feel The Heat Closing In"
"Drifting Into Solitude"
"90 Degrees at 7 A.M."

AP:  You were living in Joshua Tree at the time you started this
project.  What was that like, working on this project there? 
Obviously, the heat was a big factor in creating some of the tracks.…

RG:  Living in Joshua Tree was very difficult.  122 degrees in the shade.  I
only had a swamp cooler, no air conditioner.  Both projects, “Easels” and
“Heat” were started there but later finished in Flagstaff.  There
was no title for “Heat.”  I left for AZ towards the end of June.  My last
morning there, the U Haul was packed and ready to go.  I woke up early
and hit the road around 4 A.M., and that’s when I noticed the sun coming up!   
I took my last photograph of Joshua Tree which later not only became
the front cover, but the title followed soon after.  I was desperate to
get out of there. Around 7 A.M., it started to get hot! Very hot! 
That's when I wrote the title down while I was driving. 
90 degrees at 7 A.M."  I later matched the title with the music
which I  composed in Flagstaff AZ.  Things were cooler, and I was calmer.

AP:  You've used the Rhodes keyboard sound as well as the acoustic piano
sound a lot over the years--and have made it your sound.  When you're
working on a piece, what, if anything, makes you think in terms of
using one keyboard sound over the other, or combining the two as you've done on
several tracks....

RG:  Yes, I went back to my Harold/Garcia sound.  Stacking the midi acoustic
with the Rhodes which I installed in my piano in Flag.  It
was a new sound for me that no one has done and I’m still fine-tuning it to
this day.  I've always done synth stacking but never with my acoustic,
because it was never MIDI’ed.


Disc 1 (Trks 8, 9)
"Room Full of Easels"
"Paperback Sex"

AP:  Did you have a concept for the album after "Gatekeeper" to get
back into more rhythmic/electronic stuff, or just to do a blending of
all your various styles--ambient, electronic, piano, etc.

RG:  Exactly that.  A combination of different musical styles which I love
so much, and the piano will always make its way in there somewhere.
Like Stephen Hill said in one of his shows, “the piano is always queen."

AP: Where did the title "Paperback Sex" come from?  This is the first
time you worked with Jeff Pearce.  There were some nice backwards
guitar manipulations on that one that you told me you actually dubbed
to reel-to-reel and flipped the tape over, and got lucky.  Nice strong
rhythmic track with heavy bass line, too.

RG: When you go to a book store, or Walgreens, Walmart, supermarket etc.,
you'll always see a rack or two loaded with paperbacks intended to lure
in potential female buyers, and usually it has to do with sex!  Who's
doing who!  Who's naughty or nice, etc, etc.  I promised myself I would
compose something someday with the title "Paperback Sex".  So there you
have it!

AP:  Talk a little about the cover of the album and how all that came

RG:  In the late 80's, I did a concert at USC Irvine. It was for an art
show opening . As I was rolling in my arsenal of equipment down the
hallway, the art gallery caught my eye.  This must be the place!

Someone tapped me on the shoulder and said, "you’re not performing
here.  You belong at the room across the hallway.”  It was a huge
room full of easels!  I had to move all the easels in
order to set up and perform.  I didn't realize that a picture of all those
easels would have been a great cover.  Later down the road after I
moved to Arizona, Daniel Lentz helped me get permission to take some
pictures at the ASU art class which was filled with these huge easels
and different artwork from the students.  This was perfect, and I never
forgot that title. It was always in the back of my mind.  Someday, I
said.  Someday.

The title was the inspiration for the whole project. In fact, I loved
the title so much that the music just rolled off my fingers.

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