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Messages - deepspace

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41
Everything and Nothing / Re: Who do you look like?
« on: February 12, 2009, 04:43:40 AM »
Did I really just post that?  omg....


42
Everything and Nothing / Re: Who do you look like?
« on: February 12, 2009, 04:42:10 AM »
People tell me I look like Deepspace.


43
Everything and Nothing / Re: What does your partner do?
« on: February 11, 2009, 11:38:58 PM »
That's great, Mirko. Congrats to your wife for the ALA award. She's a smart lass  8)

My wife is a neuro-psychologist at a local hospital. Brain injury rehabilitation mainly.

(She is also an adjunct prof at the local university.)

Wow, your wife is doing what i'd love to do!! (in a career sense....AHEM!) I'm studying psychology at uni right now, and I'm extreeeemely interested in neuropsychology.  I'll be sending some hairy questions your way then shall I? :)

44
Everything and Nothing / Re: Who do you look like?
« on: February 11, 2009, 11:35:24 PM »
You look far cooler that Jovovich Lena, you're also a musician and and you also co-run Hypnos, which is like, +10,000 kudo points on top of that.

45
Everything and Nothing / What does your partner do?
« on: February 11, 2009, 02:25:39 AM »
I thought I'd start this topic, to show off my clever wife, who writes books amongst other things, such as lecturing at the University of Queensland.

She just won "Best Fantasy Novel" for her book "The Veil of Gold" out on Tor, at the American Library Awards.
yay!  (...any excuse to tell people, i know)

http://www.ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/news/pressreleases2009/february2009/rusareadinglist.cfm
 

46
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: February 11, 2009, 12:43:54 AM »
I've been going Brian Wilson mad.  His new re-recording of "SMiLE" is pretty amazing-  apart from a couple of sounds that are too pristine for my liking, the album is nonetheless an amazing realization of this period, especially considering how long ago it was.  I've been really enjoying working out some of the chord progressions.  So very good.  It would have been interesting to see how it would have been recieved back in 67, had it been released the way it was meant to be.

Also, "the Lamb lies down on Broadway" by Genesis is blowing my mind right now.

47
Other Ambient (and related) Music / Re: Jorge Reyes (R.I.P.)
« on: February 10, 2009, 02:03:44 PM »
We seem to be losing too many great artists this year. 

48
Everything and Nothing / Re: Childless couples
« on: January 30, 2009, 09:57:13 PM »
My wife Kim and I do have kids.  A 6 year old boy called Luka and Astrid, a little 2 year old girl.  We both come from working class background, and both of us had experienced family seperations and divorces as children. 

When we met back in 1989, we were both in bands, and both had quite dark feelings towards the idea of marriage, let alone kids.   We began to realise after a few years that our shared experience would create a very different world, in comparison to our childhood days.  And not only did we have two kids, but we even got married.

Now, I personally feel very different to the way I felt before I had kids.  It's pretty full-on having kids, but I can't imagine not having them now.  I can't even recall what I did with all of that spare time....But I know that I didn't feel like I had a lot of spare time pre-kids.  So, time becomes relative.  You just soak it in and adjust. 

I do envy childless couples.  With kids, you lose a lot of control.  Messy living rooms, crap all over the place...unwanted chaos/fights/sibling rivalry.  You have to swallow your pride, and compromise big-time.  But for some reason I'd be afraid to go back to pre-kid days now.  Stuff bubbled up that needed to bubble up, that couldn't have been resolved had we not had kids.  I also value my time a lot more now.

49
Music Gearheads Tech Talk / Re: Ambient music and Mastering
« on: January 29, 2009, 09:44:45 PM »

I find EQ to be far more critical to a mix than compression.  Even better, why not introduce elements in an ambient piece that touch on all of the different frequency ranges?  I find it hard to listen to some of my earlier pieces, which sound too midrangy to me.

Forrest

Yes, using instruments themselves to *create* the frequency range creates the best sounding mixes, in my experience.  That way, you don't even have to eq much- As I write and layer sounds, I always think 'which part of the spectrum will this instrument inhabit' ...at least that's what I do these days- Back in the day, I didn't, and I used to wonder why my mixes sounded so messy, and that the eq-ing was just bringing up undesirable frequencies, or 'contriving' frequencies, if you know what I mean.  Apart from the bottom end roll-off, I don't like to lower many frequencies- I feel like there is no point in recording that particular part if you're going to rob it of it's natural frequency later anyway. 


50
Other Ambient (and related) Music / Re: R.I.P. - Klaus Wiese
« on: January 28, 2009, 02:57:47 AM »
yesterday has been the saddest day of my life, I was shocked. He died of a stroke. We've been friends for 12 years, we've been sharing thoughts and feelings, and his "non-musical" teachings are now the foundations of my life.
In the last 12 years Klaus spent a lot of time in my house, playing and listening to music, talking about Life and Mystery and Religion and Music. An immense loss.
May His Light Shine Forever

This is very sad.  I don't know much about him though- I would like to know more about his releases and ideas.

51
Music Gearheads Tech Talk / Re: Ambient music and Mastering
« on: January 27, 2009, 10:36:23 PM »
Yes, it is definitely tricky mastering ambient music.  Sometimes the very thing that attracts you to something in a song you've recorded can be squashed out of existence with compression, or any other commonly used effect.  I'm always very careful to not add anything if something gives me goosebumps.  When I took "The Glittering Domain" to be mastered, I added some compression to it, and when I took the album home, I found it completely annoying to listen to- everything was suddenly 'up' in the mix- all the little nuances that were meant to be barely noticeable were suddenly clearly discernable.  So I took it back and stripped it of most of the compression, which fixed the problem. 

All the rules of production are somewhat changed with ambient.  Kneejerk production touches can be detrimental, because I guess you're dealing with such subtlety.

52
Everything and Nothing / Re: 12K vs. U2
« on: January 23, 2009, 01:13:59 PM »
What annoys me is when people are experimental for the sake of it.  I think music should be a reflection of yourself, the things you love, and your idiosyncrasies, while maintaining a healthy respect for the listener.

I take those who self-describe as "experimental" musicians to be ignorant of all that has gone before!

I'm outta here for 3 weeks holiday!

Enjoy your holiday! 


53
Everything and Nothing / Re: 12K vs. U2
« on: January 23, 2009, 12:03:36 PM »
Brian Eno once said something to the effect of: every album you release has about 5% originality and 95% generic-ness, and that's ok.  So U2 go to some other other sources for inspiration, great!  Now I've heard of Sugimoto!  Remember, U2 were all over Eno in 1985... so they're allowed to have some 'gallery cool'

I also happen to think that your photography rocks!  The loscil 'plume' cover has been a fave of mine for a long time.

Eno once also said (though I'm neatening it up here) that it is better NOT to be out on the edges doing the cutting edge stuff, that he preferred to observe the work of those who do and pull it back to the centre. That's very true...if you're making pop music. The recent Daniel Lanois DVD was interesting because it showed just how reliant U2 are for any level of sonic interest in their music on Eno and Lanois. Meanwhile, Daniel must release his own non-commercial music at cottage industry level. Often, those at the edges are not the best judges of what is valuable in their work for a broader audience.

Thanks re. the Loscil shot. I love that one too. It quietly references two early graphic influences: Factory Records and Pink Floyd's Animals cover without beng an obvious "Bonofication". ;)

Yes, that's a great statement.  But I don't think the Eno quote pertains to just pop music though- I think it pertains to all good art.  Even experimental.  Famous (or infamous) music critic and thinker Adorno says that even musical experimentalism is quite conservative by its nature-  artists work in a genre, then naturally expand it at all sides.  The expansion is part of it.  It's what is to be expected.  It usually fits within the required format of 'surprising' the viewers perception (In no way am I saying this as a negative- just saying that it's a natural part of what humans do). 

To make an example of Eno's concept working within something that *isn't* pop music, have look at a Harold Budd album: you can predict what you're going to get: somber, beautiful, gentle music, usually piano, with some synths at times etc.  There are usually no big surprises, yet it satisfies his listeners because his stance in music (impressionistic/post-minimalism yet non-classical, willfully inhibited in a good way) is unique enough- maybe there's the 5%.  If he suddenly innovated the genre and added blaring saxophones and white noise, playing them loudly over his usual piano routines, then you *might* get something interesting, but chances are it may also be rejected by critics/listeners.  Yet the  originality factor would be higher then.  What annoys me is when people are experimental for the sake of it.  I think music should be a reflection of yourself, the things you love, and your idiosyncrasies, while maintaining a healthy respect for the listener. 


Right now, it is fairly typical for listeners to describe a musical work as being 'so original' when they really enjoy it.  Take another look, and you might find that the album wasn't quite as original as you thought, and it was the actual musical material (the melodies, the sound of the instruments, the mood, the freshness of approach) and even it's adherence to the genre it pertains to represent, that got you *in*.  The downside to this whole argument, is that some artists rely on this very phenomenon (high on genre, low on innovation), and don't put much creative spirit into their work, relying purely on generic cues to attempt to satistfy the listener, which usually results in music so bland that it gives the entire approach a bad name.
 


54
Everything and Nothing / Re: 12K vs. U2
« on: January 23, 2009, 01:11:42 AM »
Actually Mark,

Seeing you're a photographer, what are your feelings on music/image relationships and their sanctity?  What would you do if U2 came along and asked you to use an image that you had used for another artist?

I'm not doing this as a test of your artistic morality, but am curious.  I would imagine you would tell them up front that the item wasn't available right? 

Just what sort of weed was Sugimoto or his agent smoking then??

 



55
Everything and Nothing / Re: 12K vs. U2
« on: January 23, 2009, 12:48:14 AM »
Certainly the photographer or his agent needs to weigh in on this vis-a-vis licensing issues.

However, Richard's work was done in close collaboration with the Washington, DC museum exhibiting the photographer's work and is obviously closely related to the images, designed specifically to be heard in relation to the images. Sugimoto was aware of this. Therefore it is a more cohesive and collaborative work of art. So IMO, the use of the image on Richard's CD deserves the "privilege".

Nothing U2 can record will have that. If they weren't so busy managing property they might find the time to realize that music has changed a great deal since Boy came out and that if they want "gallery cool" to be associated with their music they need to work harder at it.

Now, where's my copy of "He's So Fine"? No, wait, I meant "My Sweet Lord"!

As you said, the first union of images and music may have been intended for each other, and therefore sit together more (in the eye of the creators at least).  But I get the feeling that if U2 suddenly came along and were allowed to use this image, then either Sugimoto forgot, or didn't think that the relationship between image and music needs to be a one-time-only affair, and may have been happy to let others put sound to his image also.

It's probably far less serious than that though... He was probably happy to have any musical artist express an idea to his art, and heck, if U2 want try their hand, then crack open the champagne and let's play pin the mustacchio on the Mona Lisa. ;)

I do feel for the artist who thought it was 'their' picture, and then finds out that it's been given to others.  Bit like infidelity really.

As for the bit about U2 managing property, well, that's kind of what I was talking about- the minute someone becomes successful, it's assumed that the music has taken a backseat, and that their musical development becomes akin to property development.  ie.  buying/stealing ideas/styles from the underground.  I think everyone does that- I know I've taken bits here and there from the underground.  The fact that I live there doesn't make me less of a thief. ;)

The healthy balance is in that what you *don't* borrow, you make up. Brian Eno once said something to the effect of: every album you release has about 5% originality and 95% generic-ness, and that's ok.  So U2 go to some other other sources for inspiration, great!  Now I've heard of Sugimoto!  Remember, U2 were all over Eno in 1985... so they're allowed to have some 'gallery cool'

By the way Mark, I don't mean to piss you off. ;)  I do enjoy arguing with you, and I'm not trying to pick a fight. :)

I also happen to think that your photography rocks!  The loscil 'plume' cover has been a fave of mine for a long time. 




56
Everything and Nothing / Re: 12K vs. U2
« on: January 22, 2009, 07:15:20 PM »
Loren and Mike,

I am in complete agreement with both of your statements.  And I'm glad you said that. 

I think the visual artist may have been the source of confusion here, not the musicians.  A lot of people may instantly privilege the more obscure artist over the stadium gods that U2 are, just out of an 'honour amongst thieves' ethos (for the lack of a better phrase).  But I'm glad that most of the arguments I have been seeing about this issue are sidestepping that, and trying to see things for the accident they might have been, and not instantly accusing the more well-known artist (like media might, just to get the reader's attention).

Another similar recent controversy was the Coldplay/Joe Satriani plagiarism issue:  http://defamer.com/5103189/joe-satriani-sues-coldplay-for-ownership-of-years-most-annoying-melody 

I'll be interested in people's opinions on this one.  My reaction took me a bit by surprise. 

57
Everything and Nothing / Re: 12K vs. U2
« on: January 20, 2009, 06:11:24 PM »
There is plenty of bling in Hypnos already.  Obviously you haven't seen my grill.




OMG, you have an ear piercing!?

58
Everything and Nothing / Re: 12K vs. U2
« on: January 20, 2009, 05:56:34 PM »
That's sort of the opposite of controversial.

Now, if U2 would do an uncredited ripoff of "Nervous Eclipse," resulting in me & Dave T getting notoriety plus big music checks, that would be cool.

And from then on, you become known as big MG(riff) and DizzyT.  The Hypnos name is changed to HIPnos, and gets some bling on it.
Furthermore, 'Amen' style beats are added to all existing hypnos releases.  Then, of course, U2 release their next album on the label to add a bit of spice to their new sound.

59
Everything and Nothing / Re: 12K vs. U2
« on: January 20, 2009, 02:57:03 PM »
I'm thinking Hypnos contrives a similar controversy so we CAN get on 60 minutes! :)
Someone think of something controversial, quick! 



60
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: January 19, 2009, 06:46:23 PM »
I've been listening to The Zombies a lot recently and in particular their album, "Odessey and Oracle" (Yes, the title was misspelt: long story there).  They are basically one of those bands that was just missed by the public, and never got the recognition they deserved.  If you're into psychedelic 60's baroque pop, then Odessey is one of the greatest albums you're likely to hear. 

Other stuff I've been listening to: The Action, another passed-over 60's mod pop band. 



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