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Messages - Anodize DB

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81
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: October 19, 2011, 06:37:56 PM »
Darren: I will have to try some earlier bvdub. I Remember certainly doesn't work for me.
Recently picked these up a Darla
- Maps and Diagrams :: Lights will call on you
- Maps and Diagrams :: The town beneath the sea


I just picked up those 2 M&D CDs as well, Anthony; haven't received them yet.

Bvdub can be hit & miss, but overall I do like what he does. The new one on Darla (en route in the same pkg w/the M&D discs) supposedly incorporates beats as well.

82
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: October 19, 2011, 02:18:57 PM »
Wave World-The Winds of Laax.  Fantastic floaty space album from 2005.  These guys are back with two new albums, which I'll have to check out.  All their back catalog is available again, too.

Just got the 2 new Waveworlds but haven't had a chance to listen to them yet. More soon.

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ONE THOUSAND PULSES presents

AIRSCULPTURE

DATE OF PERFORMANCE: Saturday, November 5

DOORS OPEN @ 7:30 PM / PERFORMANCE @ 8 PM

ADMISSION:
$8 for advance/reserve seating, $10 at the door

FOR TICKET PURCHASE, DIRECTIONS & FURTHER INFO:
http://www.onethousandpulses.com



We’re very pleased to present British synth/sequencer mavens AirSculpture on Saturday, November 5th.

Bridging the worlds of kosmische, classic European space music and Schulzian-inspired Berlin School, AirSculpture has been tripping the neurons fantastique since the mid 90s, part of a rich UK lineage that includes fellow space travellers Radio Massacre International, Ian Boddy, and Wavestar.

A trio comprising members Adrian Beasley, John Christian, and Peter Ruczynski, AirSculpture arose as a reaction to a music scene that no longer reflected their tastes. The energy and edge of 70s EM had become diluted into a melange of clinical digital sounds played over safe pre-recorded backing. Most of AirSculpture’s music is created live on stage, improvised with little or no pre-planning. Over time it has evolved to a unique sound, melding driving Berlin School rhythms with engaging, flowing melodies, sometimes moving into darker ambient realms, or shifting gears with ‘danceable’ beats.

In all, AirSculpture seek to reclaim a heritage that derives its vitality from the pioneers of the past while forging new identities for the future. Across seven full length albums (of those, five are live recordings reflecting the real-time nature of the music), the trio continue to blast out into aural environs unknown, mysterious, and intangible, all elements which empower the very best that synth music has to offer.

> www.airsculpture.com

84
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: October 18, 2011, 06:41:38 PM »
recently

- Loscil :: Coast / Range / Arc
  (still excellent)
- bvdub :: I Remember (picked this up because of people talking about it, but I'm unimpressed)
- Bonobo :: Black Sands  (beat driven, some interesting tracks)
- Biosphere :: n-plants (kinda growing on me ... slowly)

that loscil indeed be some good stuff, as are all his recordings. i'm a pretty big aficionado of brock van wey's (bvdub) stuff, and found 'i remember' pretty much as enjoyable as earlier works (in fact, his new one on darla is currently en route). don't care for bonobo. liked the new biosphere as well, as it recalls the halcyon days of 'patashnik' though not quite as inspired.

np: terry riley's 'persian surgery dervishes' - full-on meditative/electronic/minimalist classic, as utterly compelling 30 years on as it would be if released today...resonates particularly well during the evening hours...spellbinding, hypnotic, dreamy, the descriptive adjectives are endless...

lately in rotation:

- kevin braheny 'lullaby for the hearts of space' - cassette dubbed on to CDR and one that kevin does in fact need to release on CD, as it's perhaps his best & least recognized work...two long, minimal, quasi-drones for serge modular, wind instrument and plaintive atmospherics.

- ryonkt 'small conversations' (experimedia) - expertly processed field recordings-cum-found soundscapes...microbial & macroscopic.

- patrick o'hearn 'transitions' - have gone through pat's new one three times and still fairly blasé about the whole thing. his records are always expertly recorded, played & executed, but he seems intent on resurrecting himself as a chamber-music performer/electronicist...this disc could have easily sat on either ECM or windham hill (no problem with either, certainly), but it's all somewhat inert; beautifully well done, yet i find the compositions patchy & strangely uninviting...successive plays? or right mood, perhaps?

- heretic 'yagyoi dreams' (belle antique) - picked this one up used & very rare indeed, on a recent trip to boston, and it's a very experimental & unique amalgam of electronics, asian winds, bells, gongs, guitars, etc. this japanese musician is aligned with the prog crowd, but this is quite far from rock, way too abstract, more of a bizarre melding of (edgier) kitaro with TD's 'zeit' or the more out-there heldon albums.

- thomas kessler group 'untitled' - very little known 'jazz' keyboardist, here firmly in jansen/karn/barbieri / late-period japan (the band) mode, mixing low-end funktronix with some more 'normalized' sax interludes and all manners of rubbery percussives and fourth-world-ish rhythmic patterns...obscure, and damn good (he has others, all of which i recently ordered quite inexpensively via amazon - check him out).

85
Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: Doin' the right Thing?
« on: October 15, 2011, 09:17:18 PM »
"Oh, I'm a real light sleeper, Chiles."

"I just don't believe any of this voodoo bullshit..."

:)

Surely what Carpenter & co. did was exquisite visual voodoo...


86
Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Doin' the right Thing?
« on: October 14, 2011, 12:46:41 PM »
Went and saw The Thing today & thought I'd chime in with observations, perhaps a smallish review of sorts...

Bottom line: I wanted to like it, and, in fact, did. I did my best to park any expectations at the door, as I read both harshly negative and fairly intelligent, positive reviews last night. The film, for the most part, walks a strange line between being interesting & flat. The creature effects are pretty cool; I dug 'em, but will say that they are definitely CGI-originated, and, in some scenes, are too digital, where that 'suspension of disbelief' is temporarily shattered. Although I am hesitant to make comparisons to Carpenter's classic, one element missing from this new Thing is a fairly consistent lack of suspense; there is little of that sense of ominous dread & paranoia so much a part of Carpenter's design. It doesn't help that the score is a far cry from Morricone/Carpenter/Howarth's minimal electronic pulsations, which helped immeasurably buttress that film's nightmarish atmosphere (Rob Bottin's god-like creature executions notwithstanding).

There's no doubt that this new Thing is for the most part a wholly unnecessary object that surely didn't need reinvention, but I found it diverting enough in its own right; it doesn't sully the rep of it's 1982 forebear, nor does it attain that film's grand guignol heights. At best, it achieves a respectable middle ground for its rather economical 95 or so minutes. Make of that what you will.

(Oh, and be sure to stay through at least the first half of the closing credits - pretty essential to get the whole idea of the new filmmaker's intentions.)

87
Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: Movie trailers worth a look
« on: October 12, 2011, 04:58:17 PM »
I will augment my previous post using your comment as well, Mike - *mediocre* CB movies. Truth be told, I didn't see any of the ones that came out this year, as they all looked, well, blah at best. The only one I regret missing was X-Men, but plan to catch it now on-demand; at least it benefited from overall positive reviews, and certainly looked the most interesting of them all.

I again reiterate my anticipation for Dark Knight Rises, but of course it remains to be seen whether Nolan can top himself, as DK was totally completely brilliant, and, IMO, *the* best CB film yet (Iron Man runs a close second), a declaration that, naturally, will provoke (and still does) endless debate.

Unrelated, but speaking of event films, just found there will in fact be a fifth Die Hard, sporting the appalling title A Good Day to Die Hard...oy! (No trailer for this one yet, of course. ;) )


88
Art and Literature, Movies and TV / Re: Movie trailers worth a look
« on: October 12, 2011, 08:22:51 AM »
Where's Steed and Mrs Peel?

Hee, hee...probably at afternoon tea with Honor Blackman...  ;D

I'm burned out on comic book films at the moment, but do have to admit that the Avengers trailer does look damn cool...it remains to be seen if the filmmakers can pull it off.

Next year, at bare minimum, we have both Avengers & Dark Knight Rises, both quite anticipated, although I'm betting that Nolan's Batman denouement's gonna be hard to beat.

Still looking forward to The Thing next week.

89
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: October 06, 2011, 05:48:56 PM »
Vic Hennegan 'Field of Worlds & Mirrors' (self)

Vic passed this on to me, his new one, at last week's Equinoxygen festival, and it's a simply gorgeous, vivid, lush piece of work - could sit easily on Spotted Peccary, as but one example. 'Light' Berlin School meets O'Hearn picturesque 'tronix meets tribalish pulse/gamelan...words become fleeting; I highly recommend this.

Both Vic & cohort Dean De Benedictis also performed a sterling set @ EQ2011 as well, one of the highlights of the festival, in addition to the triumphant return of Neil Nappe, who pretty much brought the house down.

90
Computers, Internet and Technology / Re: Steve Jobs 1955-2011
« on: October 05, 2011, 07:04:51 PM »
Yep, this is sad, depressing news. As a lover, owner & user of Apple products since the time I first acquired a computer (I am cross-platform, but have *never* owned a PC, and, frankly, can't stand them), it is indeed a blow to the ingenuity of the race now that a true trailblazer is gone. I still have my issues with MP3s & iPods, but I'm a deep lover of my precious iPhone (it's my chief music-making tool), and, someday, an iPad shall be mine as well, after I upgrade my 'top, that is.

This has been a tough year of human losses, on many different levels & scales. Damn...

91
I, too, have noticed similar changes in my movie-going habits, for some of the same, but also other, reasons. For my wife & I, it's more about not having the time or being able to find adequate baby-sitting that is really the obstacle, for the most part.

However, I'd augment my response by saying that most of the 'major' Hollywood films released in the past couple of years (I'm being kind here) have, frankly, sucked. Most everything has truly degenerated to sequels, prequels, endless remakes (christ, there's yet *another* Three Musketeers bowing soon; what does that make, roughly 5, 8 versions of the same damn story???), variations, in short, crashingly few things that are original, or at least seem worthwhile enough to plunk down $22 (!!!).

As a massive film lover, and writer/critic thereof, this situation does sadden me, and, as a result, I too have more or less gone the on-demand route via my Fios options when I want to watch something. It's still a choice, though, and even then the choices seem nil; I know there are numerous films out there I regret missing (and I'm not just talking about the big event films, most of which this year were *hideous*; I loathe the Transformers series—pretty much detest anything Michael Bay, one of the great hacks of our time, touches anyway—but sorry I missed the X-Men prequel, which is available on-demand now), but, again, time constraints made seeing them about impossible.

All of the above being stated, I have every intention of seeing the upcoming Thing prequel... :)

92
EQ2011 bows tomorrow - see you there!

93
Only a week to go to EQ2011. Most of the artists present will be making their Northeast debut; some, like Bernhard Wostheinrich, have never before performed in the US.

We still have tickets available — I look forward to seeing many of you here next Saturday!

95
WTF?!? Had to do a double-take when I first came across the subject heading of this post. Man, this past year or two has seen some truly sad & shocking & *very* untimely passings in the EM/experimental realm: Dani Long from Celer last year, Conrad Schnitzler recently, and now Barry. I am quite stunned & saddened to hear this news.

I knew Barry sporadically during the publishing years of i/e, back in the early 90s. In fact, we had run an interview with him for the "fourth world" special issue which included Hassell, Roach, Rich, et al. I have loved & admired Barry's work from the beginning, and closely followed his career right up to the recent collab w/Loren, which was superb. Barry's skill & abilities as an artist were unquestionable, and the presentation of his Trance Port CDs then (and now) has held them in fine artistic stead all these years. He should have garnered a far larger audience than he did, one his reputation deserved, but, alas, such is the nature of many a musician in this small corner of the universe.

He will be missed.

96
Just a month to go until EQ2011, where its roster of well-known national & international artists will be mightily singing the body electric.

In addition to such stalwart performers as Bernhard Wostheinrich, Richard Lainhart, Taylor Deupree, and DeBenedictis/Hennigan, this year bears witness to at least two comebacks by performers long absent from the stage: New Jersey guitarist & synthesist Neil Nappe, and experimental/fusion guitarist Jon Durant. Both will bring to EQ2011 what should already be an exciting day of innovative, immersive, provocative music, helping to make the first OTP fest one of the highlights of the year.

We look forward to seeing you all on October 1!

97
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ONE THOUSAND PULSES presents

MODULATOR ESP

DATE OF PERFORMANCE: Saturday, Sept. 3

DOORS OPEN @ 7:30 PM / PERFORMANCE @ 8 PM

ADMISSION:
$8 for advance/reserve seating, $10 at the door

FOR TICKET PURCHASE, DIRECTIONS & FURTHER INFO:
http://www.onethousandpulses.com


British artist Jez Creek, better known as Modulator ESP, brings his experimental synthesis project over to this side o’ the pond to kick off OTP’s Fall series of events.

Modulator ESP produces improvised experimental soundscapes using synthesizers, sampling, sequencing, looping and processing to create strange worlds of sound somewhere between 70s space music, noise, and dark ambient drone, and is fond of proclaiming that he spends far too much of time on production and sound design. In the case of the sonic end result, however, that is indeed a good thing: Modulator ESP music is that rare breed, a twist on recognizable genre templates that ensures it doesn’t fit comfortably in any given one. What made the early Euro pioneers so utterly convincing and provocative in their day was their ability to carve out sounds hitherto unheard of before — Creek’s music is full-on dejá vu, suggestive of his forebear’s alien cartographies without outright mimicking them. Although rhythms can be discerned amongst his studio and live creations, more often than not Creek tends to sublimate the obvious into what is often an amorphous, shape-shifting, extraordinarily colorful tapestry of finessed texture, expertly matched to the sinuous hues that inform his equally arresting visuals.

Creek’s listening habits encompass a wide range of music, and it shows: bits and pieces of stylistic flotsam, from ambient electronica to all manners of prog and, in his words, “weird” music, crop up throughout virtually any Modulator ESP track or performance. Fellow electronic transmitters such as Jean Michel Jarre, Radio Massacre International, Redshift, and Tangerine Dream inform his myriad influences, but truth be told, Modulator ESP is its own unique animal, the sounds Creek engineers live muddying the electronic waters to yield some beautifully engulfing and deeply imagistic waveforms.

> www.modulator-esp.co.uk

98
Just five days until the Periphery launch event in Philadelphia. Come on out for an evening of provocative, immersive electronica featuring guitarist & experimentalist Tim Motzer, Buchla bleep duo Color is Luxury, venerable longform drone maven Richard Lainhart, and minimal texturalist PTO.

Thanks in advance for your support of Periphery & its artists.

99
" title="" width="196" height="300" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-2032

ONE THOUSAND PULSES
presents

PERIPHERY LABEL LAUNCH EVENT

Featuring:
TIM MOTZER
RICHARD LAINHART
COLOR IS LUXURY
PTO


(With visuals by Richard Lainhart)

Saturday, August 20th
Opens 7:30 PM / Performances 8 PM

Studio 34
4522 Baltimore Avenue
Philadelphia PA 19143
215-387-3434
www.studio34yoga.com

$10 advance / $12 door

Ticket purchase via MyCommunityTickets:
Periphery Label Launch tickets

Further info: onethousandpulses.com / otperiphery.com

One Thousand Pulses, the Northeast's premier concert series for electronic & experimental music, invites you to the launch event for its new CD label, Periphery.

Periphery's maxim is "wrestling frequencies from the edges & otherwise", proffering uncategorizable works from musicians operating across the electronic & experimental music spectrum.

All three recent releases, including Richard Lainhart's Polychromatic Integers, and the OTP compendium Home Patterning (with tracks by Tim Motzer and Color is Luxury, recorded live in the OTP soundspace) will be available at the event.

Our launch event lineup:

> TIM MOTZER | 1krecordings.com | Philly-based guitarist and composer Tim Motzer finds infinite joy in diversity. His output as a leader and sideman crisscrosses multiple musical universes, including jazz, fusion, prog, hip-hop, soul, electronica, and the avantgarde. Motzer gets to explore these genres and the intersections between them via his ubiquitous presence in the wildly deep and varied Philly scene. He also traverses manifold territories through the many albums released on his own 1k Recordings, such as the rhythmically diverse soundscapes populating the Tilomo release, and, more tellingly, as Fractured Reverb Underground (FRU). The sole FRU CD comprises electronic studio experiments from 1999 — a decade ahead of their time — generously tipping its hat to the Orb’s Alex Patterson thanks to its psychedelic clouds of mercurial ambient textures. Motzer has also worked on releases by British singer-songwriter David Sylvian with the ongoing Secret Rhythms project comprising electronica/dub luminary Burnt Friedman and ex-Can drummer Jaki Liebezeit, as well as with German Touch guitarist Markus Reuter on Descending, a deeply sublime and stunningly beautiful work that references Brian Eno, Frippertronics, Supersilent, and David Sylvian.

> RICHARD LAINHART | otownmedia.com | Since childhood, Richard Lainhart has been interested in natural processes such as waves, flames and clouds, in harmonics and harmony, and in creative interactions with machines, using them as compositional methods to present sounds and images that are as beautiful as he can make them. Well-versed in the varied applications of his beloved Buchla boxes, yet equally agile on numerous synths, keyboards, vibes, and guitars, Lainhart has been reorganizing the topography of tone and texture for over 30 years. After studying composition in Albany under EMF founder and professor Joel Chadabe, Lainhart not only went on to create idiosyncratic recordings in his own right, but has performed and worked with the likes of John Cage, David Tudor, Steve Reich, Phill Niblock, David Berhman, and many others.

> COLOR IS LUXURY | colorisluxury.org | Obsessed with circuit-bending and inner ear manipulation, intrepid Philly experimental sound duo Color Is Luxury combines the talents of erstwhile Buchla veteran Charles Cohen and the curiously monikered hair_loss in the yielding of some of the most provocative boops and beeps around. Ripping the innards out of their respective electronic arsenals, this diminutive motley crew twist their varied sound palettes into corkscrew whorls of new shapes, sizes, and hues. Noise but not noise, drawing clear lineage from the pioneering work of Morton Subotnick, Pauline Oliveros, Gil Melle, and Wendy Carlos outward, Color Is Luxury remain tonally consciously even when they go all atonal on us, sonic provocateurs sharing a rich aural history that blossoms before your very ears.

> PTO (Pulses Tones Oscillations) is one of the numerous sound-producing aliases of Darren Bergstein, longtime music journalist, collector, historian, and archivist, former publisher of the magazines i/e and e/i, and founder/owner of both One Thousand Pulses and the Periphery label. Free improvising in the wellworn electroacoustic tradition, Bergstein has at his disposal tools old (tongue drum, rainstick, metallophone) and new (iPhone), but they're all just texture-mappers regardless of origin, simply various objects to be tapped, stroked, and struck at will.

Join us for an immersive evening of audiovisual electronic interfacing.

100
Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« on: July 29, 2011, 07:12:20 PM »
Ashera "Enviro" (Ashera) - one of the only discs I didn't own by Ashera, and it's one of his best...gorgeous, low impact ambience done with a small array of instrumentation but all the better for it.

CV313 "Live" (Echospace) - yep, there's no doubt the dubtechwhatever genre's kinda gotten beaten in to the dirt (need some new blood/ideas!) but there's something about its foggy density & narcotized atmosphere that is pretty much irresistible to me. Finally available 'domestically', though those with bigger wallets might want to spring for the Japanese issue w/extra disc.

Brecker Bros. "Heavy Metal Be-Bop" (Legacy) - fusion classic that still kicks...

Been also playing lately in my travels loads of Icehouse, early Steve Hillage, Miles' 80s live discs, Nik Bartsch's Ronin projects, and of course, the latest Periphery releases. ;)

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