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Other Ambient (and related) Music / Re: On Inspiration - Chuck Close quote
« Last post by Castleview on Yesterday at 07:35:08 PM »
That's beautiful gear but also a beautiful room. (off topic?)

Agreed.
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Other Ambient (and related) Music / Re: On Inspiration - Chuck Close quote
« Last post by Scott M2 on Yesterday at 07:05:15 PM »
That's beautiful gear but also a beautiful room. (off topic?)
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Mr. Julio why do you have an Oberheim Matrix 12 and all this gear? Do you know by the slightest chance that this discussion is because of the righteous need for bashing people using ''unnecessary high-end gear''? have you noticed that you look silly pretending that you are on the side of the people that has talent but little gear?

Do you recognize this studio?

Let me give you some flash news! It's yours!



















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I bet, they would be really disappointed by hearing, that those special places are cooking the pasta just with water, using vegetables from the local market and - more worse - having cutlery by IKEA ;D

 ;D
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Other Ambient (and related) Music / Re: On Inspiration - Chuck Close quote
« Last post by El culto on Yesterday at 04:10:56 PM »
This whole "Chef" thing has got me into this thread because I intended to stay out of it for obvious reasons.

I have been a professional Chef for the last 27 years and I emphasis "professional" because I get paid to do this.   With all these opinions floating about here some real world facts about cooking are warranted.

1.  The only essential tool a cook needs is a sharp knife, preferable a good one about a $100 and should last many many years.

2. All that "equipment" you may have seen in commercial kitchens is there for one reason...to produce food for a lot of people in a short period of time.  Practically every fancy piece of equipment can be done with a good sharp knife if you know how but often a short cut is needed because time is critical and the doors open at 5pm and the show must commence. Hence the need for fancy equipment

3. Anything done in a commercial kitchen can be done in a home kitchen....granted you might not want to smoke pork butt in your house or have a veal stock simmering for 48 hours. 

4. The creative process is a team effort in a commercial kitchen.....I write the menu, source ingredients, look for interesting flavors that work well together or contrast each other etc....but it gets handed off to the station that will actually complete the dish so there is a constant need for excellent technique and often relearning.  Part of my job is that the cooks in the kitchen are exposed to these techniques so that they can do the job and we arrive at the completed dish together during the chaos and fury of a busy service

5. There are no real short cuts.....sort of contradicting myself here....what I mean is if you want to understand sauces you have to know the traditional mother sauce that came out of french cooking.  The principles learned allow one to be really creative or break the tradition and know why you are doing so.  Training is everything and then the creative expression follows.

6. You dont have to go to culinary school to be a good cook...you do have to work in several or often many different restaurants to get the real knowledge if you choose to work in this industry

7.The equipment in commercial kitchens is only a means to an end, the most important part is the creative human factor that will make the food taste delicious, look exciting and been full of nutrition to promote a healthy and energized life.


Great post!

Reminds me of some fantastic restaurants in my town. They don´t look "polished", rather minimal from outside but offer extraordinary food, while some others in opposite advertising their skills and offers with, lets say it more friendly, "esoteric" blabla. Sure, there is a market for it and those customers clearly believe in getting something better (for a better price too…lol). I bet, they would be really disappointed by hearing, that those special places are cooking the pasta just with water, using vegetables from the local market and - more worse - having cutlery by IKEA ;D
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Now Playing / Re: Currently listening, part 1
« Last post by Joe R on Yesterday at 03:33:30 PM »
Thanks for the tip on that Surr - Asparna download. It sounds great, and I'm downloading it now  8)
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I'm not going to get into a slanging match with any individual who has such fixed and limited views on the ambient music.

I have more than 1000 albums of original files and cds, including yours, I'm not new to ambient.
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This whole "Chef" thing has got me into this thread because I intended to stay out of it for obvious reasons.

I have been a professional Chef for the last 27 years and I emphasis "professional" because I get paid to do this.   With all these opinions floating about here some real world facts about cooking are warranted.

1.  The only essential tool a cook needs is a sharp knife, preferable a good one about a $100 and should last many many years.

2. All that "equipment" you may have seen in commercial kitchens is there for one reason...to produce food for a lot of people in a short period of time.  Practically every fancy piece of equipment can be done with a good sharp knife if you know how but often a short cut is needed because time is critical and the doors open at 5pm and the show must commence. Hence the need for fancy equipment

3. Anything done in a commercial kitchen can be done in a home kitchen....granted you might not want to smoke pork butt in your house or have a veal stock simmering for 48 hours. 

4. The creative process is a team effort in a commercial kitchen.....I write the menu, source ingredients, look for interesting flavors that work well together or contrast each other etc....but it gets handed off to the station that will actually complete the dish so there is a constant need for excellent technique and often relearning.  Part of my job is that the cooks in the kitchen are exposed to these techniques so that they can do the job and we arrive at the completed dish together during the chaos and fury of a busy service

5. There are no real short cuts.....sort of contradicting myself here....what I mean is if you want to understand sauces you have to know the traditional mother sauce that came out of french cooking.  The principles learned allow one to be really creative or break the tradition and know why you are doing so.  Training is everything and then the creative expression follows.

6. You dont have to go to culinary school to be a good cook...you do have to work in several or often many different restaurants to get the real knowledge if you choose to work in this industry

7.The equipment in commercial kitchens is only a means to an end, the most important part is the creative human factor that will make the food taste delicious, look exciting and been full of nutrition to promote a healthy and energized life.


I don't know what kind of chef you are, what rank, may I ask?

1. The chef I know, have all sorts of knifes for many purposes, it's really a big set. But he cooks for a lot of people per day, 500. He's a hard working seasoned chef, not a boutique chef.

That kitchen looks more like a lab. You have for example a giant soup boiler attached to the ground with plenty of controls for temperature.

2. Industrial and pro gear will always exist in many areas, that's the reason why doctors don't go into surgery with fisher price medical kit - pink color.

3. No you can't cut kg and kg of fish and big pieces of meat in a home kitchen it's not reasonable, but my suspicion is that you've worked in a small place.

4. Well ambient is about the creation and release of personal works, with occasional collabs, so your example doesn't apply most of the time.

5. I'm a creative person, I don't have any problem with making ''sauces'' I'm not playing classical music, or reading/writing scores? Why do you think ambient is such a difficult thing to do?

6. Sure.

7. You should consider donating your expensive synths and gear.

Anyway...

Once again another person that comes to talk about ''it's not the gear, it's not the gear!'', when his studio has high end gear like the oberheim matrix 12 etc. Why do you insist in being hypocrite like this? Throw your gear out of the window and start to use what you preach to others, what do you think?



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Other Ambient (and related) Music / Re: On Inspiration - Chuck Close quote
« Last post by petekelly on Yesterday at 02:14:07 PM »
Hi Julio,

Cheers for your post, I love cooking myself (especially curries) but it's something I know very little about apart from watching such chefs as Keith Floyd, Rick Stein and occasionaly (dare I say it) Nadia G !, so it's very interesting to hear your observations and the very apt analogies you make.

Yes, for me the simplest set-up works best, I'm no keyboard player, so having banks of classic synths doesn't apply to me - in fact, I'm not really that interested in them, either. My main areas of expertise and interest are sound-design and composition. Thanks for your comments on my work, I devote a lot of time to it and I constantly seek out new techniques and processes, what i'm using currently suits me, direct-thought transfer maybe the next approach :)

Regarding mean-spirited and uninformed comments being made on this thread, I'm not going to get into a slanging match with any individual who has such fixed and limited views on the ambient music. It's just not a constructive way for me to use my energies.

Anyway, back to the subject of inspiration, the 'synth Gods' don't necessarily inspire me, but this lot do:

Killing Joke 'Primobile': 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=9n0OiWKUZKE


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I've no idea how it compares - but it has made a huge difference to my music listening and I am trying to work out how to connect my roland VS2480 to it to listen to my recording as I do it.....
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