Author Topic: Asperger's syndrome  (Read 4191 times)

deepspace

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Asperger's syndrome
« on: April 28, 2009, 12:15:16 PM »
Hi,

Sorry if I've been a bit quiet on the forums recently. 

I'm 36 this year, and the last few weeks have been pretty important for me.  I've realised that I've got Asperger's syndrome.  With hindsight, it seems kind of obvious now, and I realise now that I have always been trying to answer the question of why I feel different to everybody else.  I feel like that question has been answered in the past couple of weeks.  My son Luka, who is 6, has been displaying some of the symptoms, and we were trying to get him diagnosed, when the penny dropped.  It really shook my world up a first, but has allowed me to forgive my past, and to accept myself a little more. 

Then I thought, I wonder where I could talk to some more people who might be similar.  I clicked the hypnos link. ;) 
Are there any Aspies here, self-diagnosed or officially diagnosed?  Or self-undiagnosed?

Here's a link of some of the symptoms:

http://www.autism-help.org/adults-diagnosis-aspergers.htm

I had a lot of tics, stutters, anxiety as a child (which I still have, but I can suppress) and some of these symptoms can change to more 'acceptable' versions as an adult.  But I have to say that I don't feel as If I'm broken or anything, I feel a sense of proudness too, because some of these areas, especially the obsession with alienation, dreaminess, with which I have distinguished myself in my own life, are some of the core symptoms of this condition.   



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mgriffin

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2009, 12:59:35 PM »
Mirko, I don't have Asperger's but I suspected that someone who was close to me for a long time may have had it, though never officially diagnosed that I know of.  I think it's the kind of condition that if diagnosed and treated, can be manageable. Some of the obsessive-compulsive type impulses and related anxiety can seem pretty overwhelming but those are treatable.
 
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cromag

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2009, 01:32:37 PM »
Support is a good idea, especially for young kids with Asperger's syndrome.  But support tends to be based on where you live.  I know several groups in the US, which tend to have local chapters in the individual states and regions.  I also know a few excellent, but small, groups that operate within my home state of New Jersey.

I'm afraid I don't know too much about the international groups.

But I will say again that support is very, very important.  Sometimes we all need to spend a little time with our own tribe.


(Note -- I have never been diagnosed with Asperger's myself.  I have, however, met and worked with many kids, adolescents and adults with both Asperger's and Autism.)
Science News, Vol. 175, No. 9, April 25, 2009, page 1 -- "New mapping of the human genome shows none of us are normal."

ffcal

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2009, 07:13:48 PM »
Mirko,

Are you sure about the diagnosis?  I don't have any personal knowledge in this area, but I wouldn't be surprised if some of the symptoms listed in the link you posted were not exclusive to the Asperger's condition.  Have you thought about getting a second opinion?

Forrest

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2009, 08:52:03 PM »
Of course, most of these symptoms are quite generic and could relate to mild cases of social anxiety, for example. Actually, I can relate to many of these symptoms myself (for example speech, non-verbal communication, the social aspect quite often). I've came upon Asperger's syndrome in the past and took some on-line tests to check it out, I guess I could be described as a borderline Aspie, some told me I am, some didn't. Still, it doesn't interest me much to visit a doctor and get an official diagnosis, because I sense this could serve as an excuse to accept psychologically traits and parts of my character that can be improved with constant effort in everyday life. Then again, this is not to say that when a problem looks serious enough, professional help shouldn't be sought. But it might end up being an easy solution to tell to yourself "I'm ill" rather than adress the problem in the context of everyday situations, which is far more important.

jamiem

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2009, 11:17:01 PM »
Hi Mirko

My partners younger brother (nearly 30) was diagnosed last year with Asperger's, & her father is now booked in to see a specialist as they are sure that he has it as well.

I think you are in Queensland, (we are in Sydney, Australia) & there are a few social/community groups that get together & can give you some very good advice. My partner went to a few, & they were able to recommend the best help/assistance (from trial & error!)

Seems to be a very close & supportive network for people with Aspergers & their families.

Best wishes with it.

Jamie


deepspace

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2009, 11:41:29 PM »
I could see how some people could try to convince themselves that they have an illness or a condition, in order to become either a victim, so they don't have to try anymore, or maybe if they suffer from hypochondria or something similar.  If i just had the social anxiety aspect, I would be reluctant to go further than just a self-diagnosis. 

Some of the symptoms of Asperger's are very broad and a lot of people have them.  It's a condition that is present in a lot of people.  But I think the important thing to ask yourself is whether or not they affect your life in a way that makes you feel depressed.  Some of the symptoms are so deeply bound to myself, that they are completely part of my identity.  I don't feel negative towards them, even though they have had some very negative impacts on my confidence, because they are  part of me. 

I feel pretty bizarre right now, in a way that is impossible for me to articulate, but it's not cancer or anything, so I feel lucky in that regard and shouldn't be complaining.  But I was interested if anyone else finds themselves with similar symptoms. 
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Wayne Higgins

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2009, 06:53:18 AM »
I sometimes wonder if I have my mother's hypochondriac genes.

I read this a few weeks ago.  A close friend of mine has the same diagnosis.

Quote
Asperger's was not fully recognised as a syndrome until the early Nineties. But psychologists suggest Albert Einstein, Vincent Van Gogh, Stanley Kubrick and Jane Austen may all have been affected by the syndrome.
* GARY NUMAN
Numan was diagnosed with Asperger's in 2001, 15 years after releasing the top 10 hit "Cars". "For years, I couldn't understand why people thought I was arrogant, but now it all makes a bit more sense," he said.
* SATOSHI TAJIRI
Tajiri, the creator of Pokemon, has been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. He has been described by Nintendo officials as incredibly creative but "reclusive" and "eccentric," characteristics consistent with Asperger's.
* DAVID BELLAMY
The naturalist and TV presenter Bellamy mentions in his autobiography that, although undiagnosed, he believes he has a form of autism which may be Asperger's.
* VERNON SMITH
The Nobel-prize winning economist has spoken out about the creative benefits of Asperger's. "I can switch out and go into a concentrated mode and the world is completely shut out," he said in a recent interview. "If I'm writing something, nothing else exists."
« Last Edit: April 29, 2009, 08:45:35 AM by Wayne Higgins »
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Seren

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2009, 01:01:54 PM »
Hi Mirko - hope things go well for your family in this.

A few years back a well respected speaker on autism said that everyone has it to some extent - have you ever had to go back home to check the taps you know you turned off??? - that is an autistic tendency - but for some people the extent of the autism is much greater.

A friend of mine has not long had his son diagnosed with autism too. He does not have it himself, but has enough other health and medical issues to make up for it.....including two sets of adult teeth and a level of our happy hormones that is at best on ly 10% of what most of us enjoy - he said "finding that out was a relief as he had always been a dour bugger...."

Viniator3

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2009, 03:14:06 PM »
As one who has the aforementioned syndrome, I'd say that I find it less of a crutch and more of a motivator. I didn't get to be socially adept until I realized I had an issue with that, thus giving me the impetus to overcome that hurdle. That bit is a relief. I've tried to use its positive side-effects (obsession, secluded focus, perfunctory perfectionism) to my benefit, via my position at Apple Corporate (in this case, something that requires great problem solving ability and logical deduction) and writing a novel (a good outlet for obsessive, artistic outbursts).  Though I find myself getting burned by some eccentricities, but really, as part of who I am, I let it make me the best. Make it work!

deepspace

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2009, 04:35:09 AM »
You know what, I agree with you viniator3.  Today I was at an afternoon lunch with my wife and kids, and I was more social than I've been for a long time, and what's more, not only did I enjoy it, I was good at it too.  I think now that I know what's going on inside, I'm hell bent on proving to myself that I can be the best that I can be, and that I'm not going to sit here feeling sorry for myself for one second.

I've always been the sort of person who doesn't really know or accept his limits.  Sometimes this has been a great thing (eg. I wrote seven albums under various guises over the past two years).  And sometimes it's been a bit humbling (eg. sometimes I over-reach and fall flat on my face).  But I'll be damned if I'm going to accept any limits now.  :) 

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Wayne Higgins

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2009, 06:28:08 AM »
EBN-OZN
from  "A E I O U (sometimes Y)"
"All artists, potentially, are the victims of their desire to be unique
Just observe it
Don't fight it
Work it."
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deepspace

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Re: Asperger's syndrome
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2009, 05:55:57 AM »
EBN-OZN
from  "A E I O U (sometimes Y)"
"All artists, potentially, are the victims of their desire to be unique
Just observe it
Don't fight it
Work it."


I would alter that to "all artists, potentially, are the victims of their desire to identify and come to terms with their uniqueness"

The statement "the desire to be unique" suggests that the artist actually feels 'normal' and is attempting to distinguish him/herself.  I think a lot of artists call themselves artists (and I hope i'm not opening a can of worms here) because they felt different as children, and therefore have found themselves a role which privileges that very quality.  Uniqueness may have been viewed negatively at one stage, and embracing the term through adopting the role of artist is  a way of reconciling that difference within themselves.

I've think I've just said something very simple in an overly complex way.  :)

Basically, if you're different, you do something that makes you feel good about it.  Anyway, that's according to Leon Festinger, who came up with the idea of cognitive dissonance.



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