Author Topic: Vinyl Mastering  (Read 2484 times)

SiF

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    • Martin Fuhs - Grauton
Vinyl Mastering
« on: January 06, 2009, 02:23:48 AM »
Hi Guys,

short question. I finished recording my new Album (its been 2 years since the last
official studio album) and its set for a release on Vinyl in March/April. Does anyone
know what i should be aware of when mastering this for Vinyl? Or does anyone
know someone who could do this for me professional? Already contacted James
Plotkin and wait for his quote.

kind regards
martin

jkn

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Re: Vinyl Mastering
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2009, 08:02:56 AM »
I only know bits and pieces from what I've heard and from when I was investigating doing vinyl years ago...  I know there are some tutorials on it out there on the internet that might be worth looking for.    Be careful of stereo in the bass frequencies - that's a bad thing.   

From what I understand - mastering for vinyl is very, very (very!) different from mastering for cd...

Hopefully someone who's done it is on the forum.   
John Koch-Northrup .: jkn [AT] johei.com .: owner / artist .: http://relaxedmachinery.com .: http://twitter.com/jkn .: http://flickr.com/johei

ffcal

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Re: Vinyl Mastering
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2009, 12:42:17 PM »
I have not mastered vinyl myself, but in the days that I released on vinyl, records were mastered to conform to the RIAA equalization curve, which cuts the record with greater highs and less lows, then inverts them on playback.  I copied this explanation from a Wikipedia entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RIAA_equalization):

IAA equalization is therefore a form of preemphasis on recording, and deemphasis on playback. A record is cut with the low frequencies reduced and the high frequencies boosted, and on playback the opposite occurs. The result is a flat frequency response, but with noise such as hiss and clicks arising from the surface of the medium itself much attenuated. The other main benefit of the system is that low frequencies, which would otherwise cause the cutter to make large excursions when cutting a groove, are much reduced, so grooves are smaller and more can be fitted in a given surface area, yielding longer playback times. This also has the benefit of eliminating physical stresses on the playback stylus which might otherwise be hard to cope with, or cause unpleasant distortion.

A potential drawback of the system is that rumble from the playback turntable's drive mechanism is greatly amplified, which means that players have to be carefully designed to avoid this.

RIAA equalization is not a simple low-pass filter. It carefully defines transition points in three places - 75 Ás, 318 Ás and 3180 Ás, which correspond to 2122 Hz, 500 Hz and 50 Hz. Implementing this characteristic is not especially difficult, but more involved than a simple linear amplifier. The phono input of most hi-fi amplifiers have this characteristic built in, though it is omitted in many modern designs, due to the gradual obsolescence of vinyl records. A solution in this case is to buy a special preamplifier which will adapt a magnetic cartridge to a standard line-level input, and implement the RIAA equalization curve separately. Some modern turntables feature built-in preamplification to the RIAA standard. Special preamplifiers are also available for the various equalization curves used on pre-1954 records.

Digital audio editors often feature the ability to equalize audio samples using standard and custom equalization curves, removing the need for a dedicated hardware preamplifier when capturing audio with a computer. However, this can add an extra step in processing a sample, and may amplify audio quality issues of the sound card being used to capture the signal.

__________

Congrats on your vinyl release, Martin!

Forrest


SiF

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Re: Vinyl Mastering
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2009, 02:20:52 PM »
Thanks Forrest,

yeah i am so proud to finally release a Vinyl Record. That was also unfortunately my last
"Dream" that will come true in terms of music, so i guess i have to set some new goals
for the future.

Also thanks for the info. I will talk to the Guy who releases the record, cause i am sure
the pressing plant will master this one if needed. Totally forgot that.

Wayne Higgins

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Re: Vinyl Mastering
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2009, 10:20:42 AM »
I did a vinyl lp with a punk band in '87.  What a shocker.  I would definately get/hire someone with specific experience.  It will be worth it.

BTW, can't wait to hear it!
So, I'm a "Sr Member", huh?  In June it's SENIOR DISCOUNT TIME!!!
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SiF

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Re: Vinyl Mastering
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2009, 11:56:14 AM »
The Problem is solved. The Label will pay for the mastering which
is going to be done by a professional Mastering Guy. Which means
that i don't need to worry about this process. A good thing. Instead
of this i can plan a few Concerts for a small tour to promote the record
when it comes out. If there is anyone who know someone in Europe,
who would be interested in seeing and most of all hearing me perform
live, then please feel free to give me his name.

ffcal

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Re: Vinyl Mastering
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2009, 09:52:40 PM »
The Problem is solved. The Label will pay for the mastering which
is going to be done by a professional Mastering Guy. Which means
that i don't need to worry about this process. A good thing. Instead
of this i can plan a few Concerts for a small tour to promote the record
when it comes out.

Sounds great.  Glad that it all worked out.

Forrest