Author Topic: Vinyl Reissues vs Originals  (Read 155 times)

Scott M2

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Vinyl Reissues vs Originals
« on: April 18, 2015, 05:23:36 PM »
An interesting tidbit gleaned from a Now Toronto article with tips from Paul Kehayas on buying vinyl...

"New reissued records aren't better than original records - especially when trumpeted as '180-gram audiophile' pressings," says the soundtrack composer and member of Hollow Earth. "This is a marketing ploy and basically bullshit."

According to Kehayas, the golden age of record-making was 1960-1972 for UK and U.S. releases. The majority of those "weigh approximately 130 grams and were analog-cut at the time. Most new records are digitally cut unless they state otherwise on the packaging (most trumpet this because it's so hard to pull off!) or a website."

Records don't sound like records when cut from digital, he says, citing labels to avoid: 4 Men with Beards, Scorpio (which puts the gold 180 gram sticker on its covers), Lilith, Plain Recordings, Simply Vinyl.

chris23

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Re: Vinyl Reissues vs Originals
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2015, 08:59:30 PM »
I didn't realize digital-cut vinyl was a thing. Learn something new all the time...

ffcal

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Re: Vinyl Reissues vs Originals
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2015, 05:38:30 PM »
According to Kehayas, the golden age of record-making was 1960-1972 for UK and U.S. releases.

I generally agree, but for different reasons.  The oil embargo in the mid-70s created PVC shortages that really affected the quality of vinyl, as some of the majors like Capitol seriously degraded the quality of their own pressings by mixing "recycled" LPs in with what used to be "virgin" vinyl.  The pressings during this period were very noisy, poorly mastered and often pressed off-center.

Forrest

thirdsystem

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Re: Vinyl Reissues vs Originals
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2015, 10:02:48 AM »
Certainly agree about "Lilith" pressings.

Bought two of their Tangerine Dream releases. The "Mysterious Semblance at the Strand of Nightmares" vinyl was very poor quality. Surface noise was obtrusive for a brand new record. Doubt I would buy any of that labels output again and it certainly wasn't cheap either. Having said that their other TD release "Run To Vegas" was fine.

I mainly buy second hand vinyl......70s Prog addiction :) However all the other brand new pressing I own are excellent, especially the Boards Of Canada stuff.


Scott M2

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Re: Vinyl Reissues vs Originals
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2015, 12:57:01 PM »
I tried a little googling on digitally cut vinyl and found some long discussions on the Steve Hoffman forum and such. Apparently some European pressing plants ask for the masters as Redbook CDrs. Also, when you think about it, for quite a while people were mixing to DAT tapes anyway, so while vinyl may "warm" the mix, it's still a 16bit 44.1 or 48 source.

This is just stuff I hadn't really thought about before - I'm not a vinyl nut - though I have a wall of it. I currently like to spend my money on SACDs, DVD-As or Blu-rays with surround mixes. That's my personal audio treat. BTW - I highly recommend Diatonis for excellent ambient music surround mixes.

LNerell

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Re: Vinyl Reissues vs Originals
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2015, 11:52:52 AM »
My first album Point of Arrival that I released on cassette back in 1986 was mixed to digital. When we released it on vinyl a few years ago we used those same digital masters, although I cleaned them up some for the new release. A lot of stuff as far back as the early 1980s was digitally mixed, and those mixes were used for cutting vinyl, it's not like its a new thing and I doubt anyone can hear the difference.
Take care.

- Loren Nerell