Author Topic: Octagonal Houses  (Read 4995 times)

9dragons

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Octagonal Houses
« on: February 14, 2009, 12:10:31 AM »
This is fascinating. Why is the octagon so attractive?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octagon_house

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9dragons

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Re: Octagonal Houses
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2009, 02:36:57 AM »
That...is...freaking...amazing, Alan. Leave it to you to enhance this bizarre post with yet more magic. I was just imagining an octagonal paper sleeve design to encase a cd, but this glorious madman has so clearly dreamed bigger!

Here is the entrance to where the octagonal cd resides:

http://www.soisong.com/

I have to know where they got the octagon! Actually digging the Soisong music (haven't been a fan of Coil in the past though). This stuff sounds...sweet.

http://www.myspace.com/soisong
« Last Edit: February 14, 2009, 02:56:04 AM by 9dragons »

9dragons

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Re: Octagonal Houses
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2009, 10:28:43 PM »
From the Ontario Architecture website http://www.ontarioarchitecture.com/octagon.htm:

Unlike any other style, the popularity of the Octagon can be attributed to one person, the American Orson Squire Fowler, who is much better known for his work in phrenology - the study of analyzing a person's character traits by studying the configuration of the skull. Fowler's book A Home for All (1849) first illustrates mathematically that an octagon provides one-fifth more room than a comparably sized square house. Then the popular pseudoscientist explains how the octagon shape satisfies two phrenological needs, "inhabitiveness and constructiveness."

So here we have it, the octagon is loved intrinsically because of the shape of our skull. It is true, actually, that the octagon is more space efficient, and it is perhaps this efficiency that is pleasing to the human eye: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Octagon-v-square-2.png.

It is also the best approximation of the circle in terms of feasability of construction. I have read before that, in a sacred geometrical sense, the octagon is the "midway" point between the square and the circle. This is also touched on here in the Wiki article:

According to Fowler, an octagon house was cheaper to build, allowed for additional living space, received more natural light, was easier to heat, and remained cooler in the summer. These benefits all derive from the geometry of an octagon: the shape encloses space efficiently, minimizing external surface area and consequently heat loss / heat gain, building costs etc. A circle is the most efficient shape, but difficult to build and awkward to furnish, so an octagon is a sensible approximation. Victorian builders were used to building 45 degree corners, as in the typical bay window, and could easily adapt to an octagonal plan.



« Last Edit: February 17, 2009, 10:33:02 PM by 9dragons »