Author Topic: short feature on Pete Namlook  (Read 6778 times)

DeepR

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short feature on Pete Namlook
« on: May 24, 2009, 01:57:58 AM »
part 1:

part 2:


9dragons

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2009, 12:21:11 AM »
Very enjoyable. Pete Namlook is quite an interesting guy, I like the connection between gardening and making music. Been listening to his collaborations with Burhan Ocal lately, amazing work.

APK

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2009, 07:24:10 AM »
Most enjoyable.
Thanks DeepR.
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Mark Mushet

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2009, 06:42:49 PM »
What's interesting to me is how a lot of European electronic/ambient/experimental music, inspired by a much impoverished version of nature, seems almost always more interesting and effective at conveying a sense of it than music created in wilderness-rich North America. A subjective generalization, of course, with the present Hypnos company's much discussed faves being excepted, but I still come 'round to that thought.

petekelly

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2009, 07:19:32 AM »

'...a much impoverished version of nature...'

What a bizarre statement ???

Mark Mushet

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2009, 10:14:19 AM »

'...a much impoverished version of nature...'

What a bizarre statement ???

Not really. Look at the modern European landscape to which Namlook refers. Millennia of manipulation by farmers, wars etc. have reduced it incredibly. Now compare that to the remaining riches of North America (and...um...New Zealand) When in Germany, "getting out in nature" means a far less intense and rich experience than it does here. If you don't believe me, ask any of the many German tourists who visit BC for precisely this reason. Then listen to the music. BC produces very little while Germany produces much more (of music we all refer to around here) and talks about these connections (between nature and music) much more. Besides the population and cultural history differences, perhaps its fuelled by a greater hunger for nature.

Just a theory!

mgriffin

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2009, 10:22:00 AM »
I can't get past the wristwatch on the right hand.

Nice TR-3 though.
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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2009, 10:31:29 AM »
Actually I kept watching, didn't really stop at the "wristwatch on the wrong side" part.

 ;)

It occurs to me that if we talk about a real farmer talks about plants and agriculture, it seems like grunt work, just dirty labor.  But if an artist or a "city person" gets interested in growing things, we see it as this very rich, meaningful and interesting discovery about the significance of the natural world.  We see this a bit in our local newspaper and this little "culture" magazine called "Mix."

Farmer Joe with his overalls and dirt under his fingernails = not too interesting

Wealthy suburban couples selling their house and buying acreage outside of town to plant figs or eggplant = incredibly cool and glamorous

 
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APK

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2009, 11:03:31 AM »
I can't get past the wristwatch on the right hand.

I thought that was just a bracelet with a fax logo.
Watch is on other wrist.
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APK

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2009, 11:07:04 AM »
Mike said: "It occurs to me that if we talk about a real farmer talks about plants and agriculture,
it seems like grunt work, just dirty labor.  But if an artist or a "city person" gets interested
in growing things, we see it as this very rich, meaningful and interesting discovery about
the significance of the natural world"

Indeed.

Of course, that "we" is another city person looking at it.
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mgriffin

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2009, 11:18:29 AM »
Sure enough, wristwatch on the left side!  ;)

Actually I really enjoyed watching this little interview, even though I'm not the world's biggest FAX/Namlook fan.  Not that I dislike him or his music at all, just that I don't go to quite the extremes of FAX obsession of many ambient/electronic music fans.  It was enjoyable to see/hear him talk a bit.  He's definitely a gear whore, though.
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Mark Mushet

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2009, 11:31:59 AM »
It occurs to me that if we talk about a real farmer talks about plants and agriculture, it seems like grunt work, just dirty labor.  But if an artist or a "city person" gets interested in growing things, we see it as this very rich, meaningful and interesting discovery about the significance of the natural world.  We see this a bit in our local newspaper and this little "culture" magazine called "Mix."

Farmer Joe with his overalls and dirt under his fingernails = not too interesting

Wealthy suburban couples selling their house and buying acreage outside of town to plant figs or eggplant = incredibly cool and glamorous

Precisely. However, so much of the population is self-absorbed, living in cities and never felt any connection to the natural world. Therefore, the self-obsessed biped treats a wet chunk of dirt sliding off a freshly plucked turnip as a big discovery and potential muse! I feel lucky to have been born in a city on the edge of awesome and substantial natural treasures...though I'm sad at how relatively uncultured we are here despite having given the world...um...Bryan Adams...and "institutional star-grade" photoconceptualism (which is largely related to German artist's practices and theory).

petekelly

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2009, 12:25:17 PM »
So is it about 'quantity' as opposed to 'quality' ?

The natural landscape here in our little old UK is stunning (in parts)
It certainly isn't an 'impoverished version' of itself.

The problem is ever increasing population encroaching on what is left unspoilt.
An individual's experience of the natural world is just that - 'individual'.
Saying that, I agree that there are very few people who have any real connection with the natural
world anymore.

cheers
Pete

9dragons

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2009, 12:53:47 PM »
Many city dwellers fantasize about having a little garden. People want what they don't have. If we have big nature out the back door, like here in the Northwest, we maybe don't feel that need to dream about it. I've done extensive travel in Europe, by bicycle, and there are stunning landscapes. I would agree though that the power of nature is slightly humanized in Europe (and indeed in most other places inhabited heavily in history, like China). The nature here just hasn't been as imposed upon by generations of human thought and action. What is wonderful about Europe is the fusion between the ancient cities and the surrounding landscape. Nature and human coming together in the built environment. Witness the Etruscan cities in central Italy, which appear to grow out of the rock. Amazing. So nature is more "tamed" in Europe, but that interaction can also be wonderful. But I don't really think of the Namlook style of electronica as expressing nature. I look more to Alio Die and Oophoi for that. But here in the States we have Roach and Rich, who do an amazing job of it. In the video, Namlook seemed to be genuinely interested in gardening, and it seemed like it helped him relieve stress from being in the studio. I would say that that is so much cooler than going to the gym and expending energy to no end other than sculpting the body. At least vegetables are appearing after the exertion in the garden. Personally, having a patch of dirt to go play in would be good primordial fun. Maybe even plant some things and eat them. Living in an apartment does not afford that luxury...

Mark Mushet

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2009, 12:59:57 PM »
So is it about 'quantity' as opposed to 'quality' ?
The natural landscape here in our little old UK is stunning (in parts)
It certainly isn't an 'impoverished version' of itself.

I like the European countryside. It's lovely in spots. But comparitively, they are just that: spots. England and Europe's landscapes ARE impoverished versions of their former selves. That's just a fact. It's about loss of diversity...and enormity, both things which add to the creative spirit if you will.

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2009, 01:03:57 PM »
If we have big nature out the back door, like here in the Northwest, we maybe don't feel that need to dream about it.

I find many European musicians' music to fit our landscape wonderfully...yet I'm sure most of it was created, at most, in view of very little nature. That said, Cluster's "Sowiesoso" was deliberately made in a pastoral environment...and it shows. I wonder how Qua compares!

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2009, 02:32:12 PM »
What is wonderful about Europe is the fusion between the ancient cities and the surrounding landscape. Nature and human coming together in the built environment. Witness the Etruscan cities in central Italy, which appear to grow out of the rock. Amazing. So nature is more "tamed" in Europe, but that interaction can also be wonderful. But I don't really think of the Namlook style of electronica as expressing nature. I look more to Alio Die and Oophoi for that. But here in the States we have Roach and Rich, who do an amazing job of it.

This made me think of studies of historical European landscape painting (along with references in other art forms) that relate to the loss of so much flora and fauna there over just a few centuries. The North American plains, too, were hunted over and burned prior to European settlement. But you're right. Namlook's music does not imply nature for me either. Odd that the videographer chose to illustrate his observations of subtle change in nature by doing time-lapse shots of the play of light and wind over a field. Reminded me of Franco Fontana's photos appearing on 70s ECM LP covers.

Perhaps once BC is logged and mined flat and the salmon are gone, our ambient scene will pick up steam! ;)

9dragons

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2009, 05:44:03 PM »
Maybe his main point was that he tries to make his music and morphing and detailed as what he observes even in the simple garden. He speaks eloquently of the massive amount of detail and uniqueness even amongst blades of grass. In this sense, the comparison with what really good electronic music can do is apt.

Mark Mushet

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #18 on: May 27, 2009, 08:35:46 PM »
He speaks eloquently of the massive amount of detail and uniqueness even amongst blades of grass. In this sense, the comparison with what really good electronic music can do is apt.

Yes but I don't hear a high level of detail in his music. I think for the ultimate expression of this idea you'd have to look to modern classical music and the richer palette of acoustic instruments
(though electronics and processing of field recordings, voice etc. can be part of it). I think Paul Dolden's "Veils: Studies in Textural Transformations" would take the cake regarding the grass analogy.

9dragons

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Re: short feature on Pete Namlook
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2009, 01:25:47 AM »
"Paul Dolden's Veils: Studies in Textural Transformations"

Very interesting...is it in print on cd?