Author Topic: Software stacks and web content management systems  (Read 5693 times)

ambient789

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Software stacks and web content management systems
« on: October 25, 2009, 09:25:41 PM »
If this is a bit outside of the scope of the forum, I'm sorry.

Has anyone ever had experience with a content management system? It lets you set up web pages quickly without having to deal with much HTML. What powers a CMS is an OS, A web server (usually Apache), a Database (MYSql usually), and the PHP language. That gets taken together as a software stack(LAMP, WAMP) Although not all CMS's need a software stack to work.

I'm trying to expand my knowledge into this area and I was just curious as to the experiences of others.

Thanks.
 

darkenedsoul

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Re: Software stacks and web content management systems
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2009, 01:42:39 PM »
Hi,

I use e107 which is part of installable packages at my provider (www.powweb.com) and did some minor mods to it via its control panel within the website once it was set up via a friend who was/is familiar with it (paid for services rendered). There were various themes to choose from internally and I believe externally. I don't update it outside of PowerWeb due to them doing updates as they see fit after testing things I believe for most of the apps they provide. Not sure on that though. We just edited some of the graphics and reuploaded them and viola I was up and running after we secured things down. It has its own administration panel I log into from the site (admin only sees it). I wish I knew more about PHP and such to make it easier but it's a superset/follow-on to HTML so it isn't that hard to look at the code, make some changes, refresh page(s) and see if things work as you expect.

But that's been my experience using it for over a year or so now.

Mike

mgriffin

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Re: Software stacks and web content management systems
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2009, 09:28:09 AM »
If this is a bit outside of the scope of the forum, I'm sorry.

Has anyone ever had experience with a content management system? It lets you set up web pages quickly without having to deal with much HTML. What powers a CMS is an OS, A web server (usually Apache), a Database (MYSql usually), and the PHP language. That gets taken together as a software stack(LAMP, WAMP) Although not all CMS's need a software stack to work.

I'm trying to expand my knowledge into this area and I was just curious as to the experiences of others.

Thanks.

It's true, a content management system does let you set up web pages quickly (once the web CMS itself is configured and running) without having to deal with much HTML.  But learning to set up and work with a CMS is much more complicated than just learning HTML basics in the first place.  For that reason, if you're setting up a web site for yourself, a CMS doesn't make much sense. 

A CMS is usually used for a bigger organization, where many employees need to be able to add content or make changes, but where it doesn't make sense for everybody to learn HTML.

It's also not true that a web CMS is an entire software stack inclusive of a server OS.  Drupal or Joomla are popular web CMS systems and are completely distinct from server components.  They're basically just a PHP-based interface into a web site's internals, stored in a database (usually mysql as you say).
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jkn

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Re: Software stacks and web content management systems
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2009, 09:49:10 AM »
My key question is what are your needs and goals?     If it's a personal website that you want to post blogs, news, photos, etc...   you can go the Wordpress route or a similar blog script.    Or keep it very simple and just do html.

As Mike said - if you're wanting something my industrial strength for a very large community or an intranet behind a firewall at work... there are many options.   Joomla or on the Microsoft side of the fence... Sharepoint (which we run in a few instances where I work).

I was going to use Joomla for my new label website -but sheesh - way way way too big and complicated for what I want to show.  I ended up with Wordpress which is plenty for now.

In reality - it all comes down to what you want to do...  ask yourself what you want to do with your site - and start tackling from that directly.   

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darkenedsoul

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Re: Software stacks and web content management systems
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2009, 08:05:57 PM »
It also has to deal with what your provider is offering for *free* add-ins (powerweb whom I've been with for several years) test it and update it when they feel the need to even if my version is older than latest on the street. I went that route for easy (easier?) of use with a friend helping me set it up (paid him too as a consultant/grfx person). I can understand what is going on within php to a point, it is a hyperset or follow-on to HTML so if you understand the latter, php shouldn't be too hard to grasp.

It does make setting up a site MUCH faster, upload your graphics, edit some php files as needed, done. Well, maybe not that quick but you get my drift. Set up security/permissions and you are good to go. I put blank index files in some directories (a fair amount actually) in case someone is trying to walk the paths to hack into my site, and I recommend it be done for additional safety. But I don't do a lot of manual editing on it and power web has a LOT of add-ins to use including jooma, wordpress and the like. Just my $0.02 worth. Check out my site to see e107 which is what they offer (among others) for CMS. www.darkenedsoul.net

Mike

ambient789

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Re: Software stacks and web content management systems
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2009, 08:25:28 PM »
Thanks for the replies.

First, the reason I posted this is I enjoy technology, among other things. I'm not interested in just having expertise in computer hardware, operating systems, etc. Website creation/development offers me a bit more creativity. This may sound crazy, but I feel that with all the virtualization of servers, there may be fewer opportunities in the computer hardware and network support areas in the future. I want to keep a job!

Also, as I have indicated before, I work part time for a Midwestern municipality, and our deputy clerk, who also has some IT knowledge is mildly interested in CMS software. One of my tasks is to maintain, and further develop the website for the city. Our web authoring software is a bit out of date and while the city is on the small side, there are quite a few web pages that go into making the site.

I'm trying to look to my future, professionally speaking, and I just wanted some idea of experiences with a CMS.

Note to Mike Griffin: Yes, I do know that there are some self contained CMS's, Plone is self contained I believe, and yes I am researching that one.

Thanks.
 

treibklang

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Re: Software stacks and web content management systems
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2009, 02:11:18 AM »
If you're interested in CMS in general, the Open Source CMS website might offer you a broad look into existing open source solutions, especially, as it provides Demo installations for each CMS.
Depending on your or your "customers" needs, you might also want to have a look into commercial solutions. CMSwire has a directory of most Web-/Enterprise-CMS around the globe and should serve as interesting resource on CMS in general as well.
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