Author Topic: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008  (Read 4834 times)

Dave Michuda

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Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« on: March 18, 2008, 07:10:18 PM »
What sad news.

I remember reading RENDEZVOUS WITH RAMA in high school and absolutely loving it.  I don't know how it would hold up today, but I loved it then.  It started me off on thirty years of reading Arthur C. Clark books.  I still remember staying up until 5am in order to finish 2010.

I believe read about 15 or so of his books, some better than others(3001 was a stinker).  He was an visionary and will be missed.

I'm sure we would not have had men on the Moon if it had not been for Wells and Verne and the people who write about this and made people think about it. I'm rather proud of the fact that I know several astronauts who became astronauts through reading my books.
       Arthur C. Clarke, Address to US Congress, 1975

Bill Binkelman

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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2008, 08:14:19 PM »
I can't say this saddens in that he was 90 and had a long and incredibly amazing life, but it does sadden me in what he gave me and now he is gone. When I saw 2001 in 1968 in the Cinema II in Milwaukee, it literally changed me as no movie since has - and that's understating it. I still consider 2001 (and probably will until I die) the definitive SF film - period. The man was a visionary, to say the least. I'm so happy he lived to see some of the stuff he imagined actually occur. And I still hope beyond hope that SOMEONE films Rendezvous with Rama, which would so kick ass.

Rest well, Sir Arthur. I hope you find out that it is indeed "full of stars."


Seren

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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2008, 06:25:08 AM »
Well said Bill, I completely agree.

when i saw 2001 i stayed through the film twice (risking my parent's ire for coming home late) - 2nd time i was only one in the theatre and i went front centre seat for the stargate trip....

Vir Unis

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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2008, 07:29:31 AM »
The only thing sad about it is where are writers like him today?  He did live an amazingly long life filled with incredible insight into the human condition and a passion for it's evolution.  Rest in peace Sir....

VU

Bill Binkelman

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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2008, 07:35:29 AM »
I was so enamoured of the movie that I smuggled in a my small cassette tape recorder and recorded the movie "sound" dialogue/effects (not music since I could buy the soundtrack). When I got it home, I transcribed the dialogue onto paper. To this day, I instantly recognize the sounds that the computers make on board the pods...those same sounds were used in many other SF films. And the dialogue is engrained in my head.

"Welcome to voice print identification. Please state your name, surname first, Christian name, and initial."

"I'm just on my way up to Clavius."
Oh, are you Dr. Floyd."

"Well, as I said, I'm really not at liberty to discuss it."

"What is that, chicken?"
"Looks like it. Tastes like it, anyway."

"Deliberately buried, huh? Well, I must say, you guys have certainly come up with something."
"Watch it, it's hot."

"Roger your plan to EVA and replace Alpha-Echo 35 unit."

(sigh)

mgriffin

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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2008, 08:46:52 AM »
Seems that most of us would say 2001 is Clarke's lasting legacy, and probably with good reason in terms of wider cultural impact, but Clarke himself might well have pointed to Rendezvous With Rama, or Childhood's End, or something else.  Maybe Brian B or someone with greater SF knowledge that I have, can speak to some of the aspects of Clarke's legacy that might be neglected in some of the shorter summaries of his work.
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Bill Binkelman

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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2008, 09:01:20 AM »
Mike,

Glad you brought up Childhood's End which, IMO, remains a mystery why no one has tried filming it (I know it has been optioned by more than one studio). Childhood's End, IMO, is probably the best thing Clarke wrote, and it certainly was unique in its perspective on the ultimate purpose of an alien visitation to Earth back when most aliens were bad-asses. I need to re-read it as it's been way too long since the last time. I remember how deeply I was affected by the book when I first read it.

Yeah, I'd love Brian B to chime in on this topic.

Wayne Higgins

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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2008, 12:08:59 PM »
"This conversation no longer serves any purpose."
The greatest line of all time, especially knowning it's a computer talking to a human.
He will be missed.
So, I'm a "Sr Member", huh?  In June it's SENIOR DISCOUNT TIME!!!
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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2008, 04:10:46 PM »
Mike,

Glad you brought up Childhood's End which, IMO, remains a mystery why no one has tried filming it (I know it has been optioned by more than one studio).

I think often when these major, important works of sci-fi never end up on the film screen, is that the people who option them never come up with a concept that will keep the budget within reach.

I just finished listening to the audiobook of Snow Crash, and I think it's the same way.
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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2008, 04:03:33 AM »
I can't say this saddens in that he was 90 and had a long and incredibly amazing life, but it does sadden me in what he gave me and now he is gone. When I saw 2001 in 1968 in the Cinema II in Milwaukee, it literally changed me as no movie since has - and that's understating it. I still consider 2001 (and probably will until I die) the definitive SF film - period. The man was a visionary, to say the least. I'm so happy he lived to see some of the stuff he imagined actually occur. And I still hope beyond hope that SOMEONE films Rendezvous with Rama, which would so kick ass.

Rest well, Sir Arthur. I hope you find out that it is indeed "full of stars."


I've read several of Clarke's novels but can't remember much about of most of them - this is not a slight on Clarke's writing, but rather a reflection of my poor memory. Rendezvous With Rama is a classic, though I enjoyed the other books in the Rama series more because they developed the story further.

Let's not forget that Clarke's writing even inspired the instrumental album The Songs of Distant Earth by Mike Oldfield.

--
Dene

Brian Bieniowski

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Re: Arthur C. Clarke 1917 - 2008
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2008, 06:26:15 AM »
Seems that most of us would say 2001 is Clarke's lasting legacy, and probably with good reason in terms of wider cultural impact, but Clarke himself might well have pointed to Rendezvous With Rama, or Childhood's End, or something else.  Maybe Brian B or someone with greater SF knowledge that I have, can speak to some of the aspects of Clarke's legacy that might be neglected in some of the shorter summaries of his work.

Certainly 2001 will be what most people remember Clarke for, that's without a doubt.  He was the last of the trinity of Founding Father science fiction authors (along with Asimov and Heinlein), so, to all science fiction readers, it is the end of an era.

Childhood's End is my favorite Clarke book, but it's hard to argue with the enormous cultural watershed that was 2001.  Clarke helped popularize the space program, inspired legions of scientists, and, not least, essentially "invented" the idea of using geostationary satellites for telecommunications.

The man was a giant!
« Last Edit: March 20, 2008, 06:29:11 AM by Brian Bieniowski »