Author Topic: Ambient Guitar  (Read 14709 times)

spunknik

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2008, 05:31:02 PM »
I love Fear Falls Burning and I am glad that dirk makes the records very collectable.I hope he never reissues any of them.I simply cannot wait until Frenzy comes out.Of course he's also my favorite ambient music composer.

SiF

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2008, 03:49:57 AM »
I love Fear Falls Burning and I am glad that dirk makes the records very collectable.I hope he never reissues any of them.I simply cannot wait until Frenzy comes out.Of course he's also my favorite ambient music composer.
I do have my Copy of "Frenzy of the Absolute" lying here. Good to have connections. ;)
Will listen properly to it this evening. The Artwork is stunning though.

petekelly

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2008, 01:36:28 AM »
Well it appears I may well have been wrong about 'ambient guitar' being overlooked,
judging by the many artists (mostly unknown to me) named here

Dave, I checked out the Scott Solter album's mp3 snips - very nice.
 
Hi Jeff, cool to see one of the top (IMO) ambient guitar geezers reply. I tried that Ebow thing - wierd one ! I couldn't get much out of the one Sundummy posted - maybe I was doing it wrong.  ???

cheers
Pete

jeff pearce

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2008, 04:30:51 AM »

 
Hi Jeff, cool to see one of the top (IMO) ambient guitar geezers reply.

Geezer?!?!?  I'm only in my 20's!  Well, late 20's.

....ok- I'm 40, which, technically, is the REALLY late 20's.......  :'(

It's been a LONG time since I've released something purely "ambient", so I don't know if I qualify as an ambient guitar geezer anymore- but I DO remember some of my favorite tricks, and one of them is more from a signal processing point of view- specifically, using two reverbs.  Guitar goes into one reverb unit, the output of that goes into another.  It's like sleeping under two blankets on a cold winter night!  :)

In the end, Pete, all these things are cool, and make cool sounds.  Sounds are fun, but music is better.... :)  However, I know you know this already, because your most recent cd reflects this thinking- at least to my ears!

Jeff

michael sandler

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #24 on: April 22, 2008, 04:32:26 AM »
Whether this would matter to anyone playing and/or playing with a guitar- there are a lot of fun things going on "under the lid" of strat style guitars- or any electric guitar that uses springs to anchor the trem.

It's great if the springs are old and squeaky. Then you can do haunted house dive bombs.

Mike S.

Undershadow

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #25 on: April 22, 2008, 04:49:10 AM »
I have a couple of handy compilations that demonstrate the wide ambit of ambient geetar, and the instrument’s versatility, one from the US and one from AU:

TEXTURE: A COMPILATION OF MINIMAL AMBIENT GUITAR

TRACK LISTING //
JASON SLOAN: GRACE AND BOUNTY //
EXUVIAE: PULSATILE //
JEFF PEARCE: HARBINGER //
MIKE BENNETT: BELTRANE //
ALAN IMBERG: LOST SO MUCH //
MATT BORGHI: LANSING //
NUMINA: MARE'S TAILS //
TONY GERBER AND ROB JENKINS: RED SUN //
MICHAEL KIRSON-GOLDAPPER: DISTANCE //
ANOMALOUS DISTURBANCES: QUICKENBERRIES //
REMCO HELBERS: URBAN NIGHTSCAPE II //
TRUE COLOUR OF BLOOD: TWILIGHT STATE DREAM //
MARKUS REUTER: UNTITLED




http://www.slobormedia.com/releases.html


Then there’s one on Dreamland Recordings, called STRING THEORY:

“String Theory represents an extensive selection of the most original guitarists I have come into contact with over the past few years.  Split over two discs, these 30 tracks represent a varied selection of styles, textures and techniques, all with the common ground of the guitar.  The majority of these artists are based inMelbourne, but other Australian cities and overseas players are represented as well.  Some artists have been developing their work for years, whilst others are relative newcomers and remain obscure to a degree.  String Theory serves both as an introduction to new ears and a tribute to the instrument’s most original exponents. – Zac Keiller, Dreamland Recordings.”

(pardon my oversize JPEG)



http://www.dreamlandrecordings.com/String_Theory.htm

(Oh, and the appellation 'geezer' is non-specific in regard to age, Jeff, so no harm done in being called that by Pete - the time to worry is when you're called an OLD geezer, old geezer... oops! ;))


Gurdonark

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2008, 07:20:23 PM »
I love ambient guitar, whether it is Jeff Pearce's, Solyaris', Verian Thomas', or even the near-ambient angles of Durutti Column.  I love it when it is rendered into drone, and I love it when it is much less fxeffected and yet still has an ambient angle.

Among sources to morph into ambience, the guitar just is so versatile. Life really happens in ambient guitar melody.


Exuviae

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2008, 12:08:03 PM »
Guilty here. A great instrument for making "odd" music. Nothing else sounds like it...electric bass, too...awesome! Just yesterday I ran bass into pedals into synth into eq into Ableton into more fx...got a lots of mileage out of two notes!

darkenedsoul

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #28 on: May 02, 2008, 10:07:02 AM »
I have been taking lessons for a bit to learn to play the guitar. I've got the following:

Fender Acoustic starter pack kit, not a bad sounding acoustic and wanted it to do something along the lines like Desiderii Marghini does in his later works
Ibanez RG7321 7 string electric with low B 7th string for that nice low end ;-) (hey I am a doom junky!)
Ibanez GAX70 SG style 6 string standard tuning which I use mainly at lessons, my first electric I bought, then got the acoustic.
Peavey Predator Plus 6 string tuned down to A for the real low end (my buddies band Evoken's latest album was tuned to A and I want to learn some of the songs - waiting on Nick to get me some tabs ;-) ) and it has the floyd rose floating bridge. I have it locked down and no whammy action on it (it's low enough and i wasn't planning on wanking on the strings with the whammy bar at that low of a tuning)

V-amp 2 processor/pod unit w/Behringer FCB1010 footswitch (one I used w/my Triton Extreme for patch switching)
Peavey 15w 8" speaker guitar amp (makes enough noise for me and I am not looking to get into a band to play guitar live any time soon/at all actually.

But since I have Native Instruments Guitar Rig 2 and 3 on my laptop/desktop systems I can plug into my Omni Studio breakout box and mess with it there. I figured I could eventually come up with some evil sounding stuff after I figure out processing of it in the application level. Any insight appreciated. I wouldn't be using the v-amp for any of that. I figure it'd be interesting to try and do some droney stuff with it.

MarkM

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #29 on: May 08, 2008, 07:07:22 AM »
I think the new Moog guitar that has been rumored about should be a great instrument for ambient.  Supposedly each string can be infinitely sustained and played simultaneously.

Undershadow

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #30 on: May 20, 2008, 02:42:43 PM »

Parhelion - Forgotten Outpost = very atmospheric - nice guitar.

Listening link on this page: http://angryape.com/media/2008/03/28/parhelion-forgotten-outpost

Or click here to go straight to the mp3: http://angryape.com/media-files/Ihor%20Diawdiuk%20-%20Forgotten%20Outpost%20(PhantomChannel.co.uk).mp3


solyaris

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2008, 09:14:15 AM »

... Windy & Carl, Stars of the Lid:  all these guys have a distinct, unique sound because of the guitars; with synths, it just wouldn't be the same.

yes ... a lot of threads about that on hypnos forum was lost, showing my point of view about my motivation of use of guitar as sound source (infortunately all old releases of this forums post database seem lost ... that's a big pity).

Robert Fripp, Robert Rich, Jeff Pearce, Adam Wiltzie (Stars of The Lid), Carl Hultgren (Windy&Carl),
are all artists that used (use...) (guitar) string vibration as "source" of further elaborations .

I think that electro-acoustic ("analogic") waves possess huge complexity/richness that personally I never obtained with (digital) synths. This come in evidence when the strings are plucked with e-bow (just yesterday I relistend "Stars of the Lif "ballasted orchestra" that is played 90% with e-bowed lap steel guitar); the e-bow super-excitation of string produce chaotic waves, that made the sound so rich ...

The electric guitar as the primary source for creating ambient music seems a tad overlooked.

I agree with Alan that it can be the processing that makes the sounds interesting, but not
necessarily just a bit of scratchy, glitchy jiggery-pokery kind of thing. The software available now
can really transform the source sound - naturally, it helps if people play something interesting in
the first place ! All manner of looping, granular synthesis, spectral manipulations and the like
allow for a lot of scope.

I was pretty much introduced to ambient by Eno's music, so I initially thought it was all treated
synths and Rhodes Piano, but I discovered lots more.

yes... personally I dislike the computer-elaboration of guitar source with computer filters (just that "re-sampling" as you define "scratchy, glitchy jiggery-pokery kind of thing")  that I "indentify" with Fennsz music (I'm sorry) and a long sequel of guitarists that does the same ...

btw, Rhodes piano (an instrument I really love) is another good example of beatiful "analogic" source vibrations ... in that sense it's a n input similar as a guitar: because the electro-acoustic/mechanical source generation ... every note is really unique and sound processing of rhodes chords achieve amazing results ...

giorgio

solyaris

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Re: Ambient Guitar
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2008, 09:19:32 AM »
Whether this would matter to anyone playing and/or playing with a guitar- there are a lot of fun things going on "under the lid" of strat style guitars- or any electric guitar that uses springs to anchor the trem.  I've taken the back plate off my strat and have often "strummed" the springs while holding a chord with my left hand.  Spooky, ghostly, and will almost certainly shred your right hand fingernails, so it's beneficial to use a pick for this.

Pete- an ebow technique that *I* have found to be fun is to place the ebow on the fretboard with your right hand- let's say around the 5th fret of the 3rd string.  Then, in the left hand, hold a slide around the 12th fret of the same string, and start moving up and down the fretboard.  All sorts of crazy overtones pop out, and you can switch strings, etc...

Jeff

first of all WELCOME JEFF here! :)

about the use of e-bow as you described, of course excellent examples are in pretty all your old CDS (that one when you used also the SpaceStation pedal) if I well remember.

On the other hand I I think the e-bow + slide techniche achive the superior result in amazing Robert Rich's lap-steel guitar (btw, he used the double force of sustaniac + e-bow, if I well remember)... anyway amazing unique sound!  On the other hand I'm a bit less convinced on some e.bow "dark drone" usage of that by Stars of The Lid that anyway are masters for me.

giorgio
« Last Edit: May 26, 2008, 09:21:30 AM by solyaris »