Author Topic: Interspecies Music  (Read 3069 times)

9dragons

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Interspecies Music
« on: June 02, 2008, 04:31:26 PM »
Curious to know what the forum makes of this site:

http://www.interspecies.com/index.html

This musician goes out on boats, sticks microphone in water, and plays along (or jams with) sea life! They featured this amazing guy (Jim Nollman) on NPR some time ago, and I wrote down his name. Just rediscovered it, and went to the website. Haven't checked much of it out yet, but it is very exciting, even just for the fact of what they are attempting! The description of how Orcas reacted to a Tibetan lama chanting, and the sound clip, are very intriguing:

http://www.interspecies.com/pages/lama%20sound.html

ffcal

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Re: Interspecies Music
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2008, 09:43:58 PM »
Interesting, though probably more so for the humans, unless whales start developing a taste for Coltrane or Hendrix.  What, no credit given to Paul Winter or Paul Horn (who  were probably the first ones to do something like this in the early 70s)?

Forrest

9dragons

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Re: Interspecies Music
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2008, 05:39:15 PM »
When I heard about this guy on NPR some time back, the program really made it seem that the animals took part in and responded/interacted with the music that was being played. But just browsing the sight, it seems kind of disorganized, and I can't really find a full on summary of what they were doing and the results. Must check deeper.

Scott M2

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Re: Interspecies Music
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2008, 08:48:37 PM »
Interesting, though probably more so for the humans, unless whales start developing a taste for Coltrane or Hendrix.  What, no credit given to Paul Winter or Paul Horn (who  were probably the first ones to do something like this in the early 70s)?

Forrest


Here's some quotes from "Can We Play Live Music with Whales?" by David Rothenberg
http://www.realitysandwich.com/can_we_play_live_music_with_whales

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"Who has played music to killer whales? Paul Winter, for all the great photos of him and his soprano sax standing in rafts playing pure tones out to leaping orcas, says he just tried it once, thirty years ago, blowing the sax into a big metal tube that stuck into the water. He heard the whales, the whales heard him. "At one point it seemed like they were responding," he says, but this live interaction never made it onto his records the way the sax/wolf duets did."

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"When a whale named Haida lost his mate, he sat despondent in the pool as if she too wanted to die, refusing to eat anything for a month. (Paul) Spong invited jazz flutist Paul Horn, known for his solo recordings inside the Great Pyramid and in the Taj Mahal, to offer some gentle music to cheer up the bereaved whale. For a week he played mournful elegies for the whale's lost love, but Haida showed no interest. One of the trainers urged Horn to try a more positive approach.

"I get the feeling you are playing rather sad music," she said, "reinforcing Haida's unhappiness. Maybe you should try providing some positive energy to bring him out of his depression."

Horn leaned over the water and talked to Haida eye to eye: "Look, I've been coming here for three days now and you have totally ignored me. I get no response from you, and I'm getting bugged."[ii]

The whale said nothing. Horn continued. "We know you've suffered a great loss, and we sympathize with you. But thousands of people come to see you, they respect and admire you, but you're letting yourself down. Not only that, you are letting yourself down and you're letting life down. Life is a very precious thing, Haida, so get your act together and snap out of it. I'll come back one more time. If you don't respond tomorrow, then I won't come back again."

The next day Paul Horn was back at the pool, playing the same mournful music he always played. But right away Haida moved his head, the first movement he'd made in weeks. Horn walked around the pool, playing his flute with conviction, just like he'd famously done walking around the Taj Mahal. For the rest of that week the whale followed the flutist, and after five days, Paul put his flute down and dangled a herring over the water. Haida hesitated a moment, but then decided to scarf it down. It was the first food he had taken in a month, and the first time a whale was known to have been brought out of depression through music therapy."

There's much more on this in the piece at the above link.