[ Hypnos Forum ]

OTHER THINGS IN THE WORLD THAN MUSIC => Everything and Nothing => Topic started by: mgriffin on November 10, 2009, 10:27:52 AM

Title: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 10, 2009, 10:27:52 AM
The 100 Best Films of the Decade
From the London Times

http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/film/article6902642.ece?print=yes&randnum=1257554128289 (http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/film/article6902642.ece?print=yes&randnum=1257554128289)

I love lists like this, and the arguments they produce.  I especially appreciate being clued-in to things I'd missed, or reminded of things I'd intended to see but forgotten about (Hunger, Last King of Scotland, The Lives of Others).  I suppose there's also a some kind of positive feeling to be derived from confirmation by a "professional" that something I considered great and possibly underappreciated (Let the Right One In, for example, or the Diving Bell and the Butterfly, which I'd rate even higher than it appeared on the list) maybe wasn't as underappreciated as I thought.

I don't want to post the whole list of 100 here in one chunk, but here's the top 10, along with a few of my comments.

Quote

10 Hunger (Steve McQueen, 2008)
Provocative London-born artist McQueen directs a revelatory Michael Fassbender in a movie that purports to tackle the infamous 1981 IRA hunger strikes but is actually a hypnotic meditation on the ineffable mystery of human life. Achingly profound.

9 The Queen (Stephen Frears, 2006)
Compassionate and intelligent, witty and wicked, this account of what happened behind the Palace gates after the death of the Princess of Wales is a crown jewel of a movie. Helen Mirren is a very human HM.

8 Casino Royale (Martin Campbell, 2006)
The high camp of the Brosnan era Bond is ditched, and Fleming’s hero returns rebooted (and Bourne-ified), with an intense turn from Daniel Craig, and some breakneck set-pieces. An opening parkour-style chase through Madagascar sets the tone.

7 The Last King of Scotland (Kevin Macdonald, 2006)
Forest Whitaker gives one of the great performances of the decade as Idi Amin. He nails the Ugandan dictator’s deadly charm — he’s a charismatic monster; part amiable buffoon, part stone-cold killer.

6 Slumdog Millionaire (Danny Boyle, 2008)
Twelve years after Trainspotting, Boyle produces a dizzying Mumbai-set romance that redefines the possibilities of a progressive yet commercially successful national industry. Oscars abound.

5 Team America: World Police (Trey Parker, 2004)
The South Park creators launch an assault on pretty much everyone, from North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il to poor, hapless Matt Damon. It’s jaw-droppingly offensive and wildly funny.

4 Grizzly Man (Werner Herzog, 2005)
Party nature documentary, part philosophical tract, Herzog’s eerie account of the life and brutal death of mildly unhinged bear-watcher Timothy Treadwell is a monumental piece of cinema — emotionally satisfying, intellectually stimulating, but primal to the core.

3 No Country for Old Men (Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, 2007)
The alchemic combination of the Coen brothers’ eloquent precision and Cormac McCarthy’s vivid nihilism makes for a bleakly compelling cycle of violence. The only thing more terrifying than Javier Bardem’s haircut is the clinical efficiency of his murders.

2 The Bourne Supremacy / The Bourne Ultimatum (Paul Greengrass, 2004, 2007)
The action movie is dragged, kicking and back-flipping, into the Noughties courtesy of Matt Damon’s amnesiac superspy and director Greengrass’s film-making élan. Marrying jittery docu-style camera work with healthy political cynicism, Greengrass transformed Bourne into an anti-Bond for the PlayStation generation.

1 Hidden (Cache) (Michael Haneke, 2005)
It is only as the decade draws to a close that it becomes clear just how presciently the Austrian director Michael Haneke tapped into the uncertain mood of the Noughties. The film’s twin themes resonate perfectly with the defining concerns of the time: tacit national guilt about a questionable foreign policy, in the film it’s France’s occupation of Algeria, but it’s not hard to piece together the parallels with more recent conflicts. Plus, as round-the-clock surveillance became a part of our daily lives, here was a film that captured the creeping paranoia that resulted from the eyes of unseen strangers invading private life.

Daniel Auteuil and Juliette Binoche star as Georges and Anne Laurent, the successful couple whose charmed life is disrupted by a series of covertly captured videotapes of their family and home. The campaign pertains to some unspoken and long suppressed event. Auteuil and Binoche are both excellent — their brittle, abrupt performances etch out the fracture lines in their crumbling relationship. But the film’s brilliance comes from two striking, perplexing moments in the film. The first is a shockingly violent suicide that catches the audience off guard. The second is the film’s ambivalent ending — a long shot of a meeting on some steps which could signal the end of the family’s torment, or the beginning of something worse. There have been rumours of an American remake with Ron Howard, of all people, directing. Hopefully common sense will prevail.

The first surprise, obviously, is Cache/Hidden at #1.  I thought this was a very interesting, cerebral film, quite different and mysterious.  But the best film of the past decade?  I guess it's not my list.

And the two Bourne movies at #2.  These were actually pretty well-done, and not just brain-dead entertainment of the bullets-and-bombs, though pleasing enough for the adrenaline-junkie crowd.  But as for these films, individually or put together, being the second best work of the last decade, let's just say I disagree!

Several other obvious & predictable choices in the top 10, though I was pleased and amused to see Team America: World Police in there.  That movie was just packed with ideas and lots of fun, and I think everyone should see it once.  I guess lists like this will convince some people to give it a whirl.

Grizzly Man seems to be well-known to a certain crowd, I guess the kind of people who don't mind driving downtown to an "art cinema" or renting a DVD out of the documentary section, but to others who haven't heard of it or barely know what it is, I'd say this is one of the more incredible, shocking films you'll ever see.  Sometimes truth really is stranger than fiction.

As I said above, Last King of Scotland has long been on my "watch soon" list and this has convinced me to prioritize it higher.

Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: judd stephens on November 10, 2009, 08:50:43 PM
As a somewhat narrow sci-fi, action and comedy junkie, I only saw about 4 of the movies listed there in the top ten.  There was one sci-fi movie I would put really high though, and that was Children of Men.  It was certainly better than the James Bond flick.  I mentioned District 9 recently and that is also hands down one of the best movies I've seen this decade.  The 2 born sequels made it so high, but higher than the first Bourne Identity?  I don't know 'bout that one. 

I agree about the Grizzly Man, what a wild movie.  So sad but so funny at times.  Never did get around to watching Team America or 'King of Scotland, but Forrest Whitaker's character made the latter one look compelling.

Surprising not to see either of Steven Chaow's Kung Fu Hustle or Shaolin Soccer there, with all the comedies that made it on the 100 list...  maybe I missed reading them.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: hdibrell on November 10, 2009, 10:13:21 PM
What! :o Not even a mention of The Magnificent Seven?? ???
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Wayne Higgins on November 11, 2009, 07:24:02 AM
There will always be problems with such lists.  There Will Be Blood down at 63?
Missing...
Letters From Iwo Jima
The Reader
Juno
Sideways
The Pianist
In The Bedroom
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Chicago
Match Point
Million Dollar Baby
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Wayne Higgins on November 11, 2009, 07:24:48 AM
btw
has anyone seen Departures?  I haven't found it on dvd yet.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Seren on November 11, 2009, 09:19:05 AM
Do we know how many films were made in the decade?
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 11, 2009, 09:34:02 AM
There will always be problems with such lists.  There Will Be Blood down at 63?
Missing...
Letters From Iwo Jima
The Reader
Juno
Sideways
The Pianist
In The Bedroom
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Chicago
Match Point
Million Dollar Baby


Sideways was #27

Yes, there are definitely some choices we could argue with, such as leaving off (fill in the name of well-regarded "serious" film here) in favor of Team America: World Police and so on.  The usual problem with such lists is the emphasis on "serious" dramas and foreign films, and very little in the way of comedy, experimentation, or genre films.  I think this list does a decent job of mixing it up a bit.

Also remember this is not an American list and as such, seems to have less emphasis on Hollywood films than American moviegoers might expect.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Hypnagogue on November 11, 2009, 10:49:44 AM
I cannot abide any "Best Movies" list that fails to acknowledge the beauty, splendor, and philosophical depth of "Big Trouble In Little China."


(Oh, wait...just this decade? Okay, I give it a pass.)
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 11, 2009, 10:53:11 AM
"I feel good, I'm not scared at all.  I feel kind of... kind of invincible."

 ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 11, 2009, 11:04:25 AM
As I did for the top 10, I'm going to post and comment on the next 10, taking us through #20.


Quote
20 Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)
Head-tripping sci-fi goes to high school in an Eighties-set psychological thriller with dark Lynchian overtones. Jake Gyllenhaal plays the titular teen — a possible paranoid schizophrenic who may just have the key to time travel.

19 United 93 (Paul Greengrass, 2006)
Shattering, sobering and uncompromising, Greengrass’s masterful drama set onboard one of the 9/11 hijacked planes is resolutely unsensational — and is all the more powerful for it.

18 Let the Right One In (Tomas Alfredson, 2008)
The biggest vampire movie of 2008 was Twilight, but its bloodless inanities were exposed by this Swedish chiller. Here Kare Hedebrant plays a bullied pre-teen whose burgeoning relationship with an equally alienated girl-vampire radically alters his dull suburban existence.

17 Brokeback Mountain (Ang Lee, 2005)
This achingly sad love story gave Heath Ledger a chance to explore hitherto unsuspected depths. It’s a hugely powerful performance — his inarticulate yearning is almost painful to watch.

16 Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
Testing the limits of narrative convolutions and visual technique, Gondry directs an ingenious script about memory-wiping. A central tempestuous romance between Jim Carrey’s Joel and Kate Winslet’s Clementine, however, is never once overshadowed.

15 Downfall (Oliver Hirschbiegel, 2004)
One of the most extraordinary cinematic explorations of failure, disappointment and thwarted ambition ever made, this tale of Hitler's final days features a savage, dazzling performance by Bruno Ganz.

14 4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days (Cristian Mungiu, 2007)
The tale of an illegal mid-term abortion in Ceausescu’s Romania was never going to be easy. And though the details are harrowing, Mungiu, a former journalist, has such compassion for his heroines Otilia and Gabita that the pain is almost palatable. Almost.

13 This Is England (Shane Meadows, 2007)
Meadows’s most personal film is a real treat, combining the director’s impeccably observed comedy with a gathering storm cloud of ominous ill will and violence. Honest, authentic and ultimately shattering.

12 The Lives of Others (Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006)
A mercilessly efficient account of Stasi surveillance in mid-1980s East Germany is anchored by a haunting performance from Ulrich Mühe, who died from stomach cancer just after the film’s release.

11 Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (Larry Charles, 2006)
The decade’s favourite sexist, anti-Semitic, racist homophobe, Borat picked at the scabs of America’s intolerance and hypocrisy. Sacha Baron Cohen’s status as the most fearless man in comedy is unlikely to be challenged in the near future.

Borat is another one of those like Team America to which I can easily imagine many objecting.  It really is an amazing film and something I think everyone should see.  The point, obviously, is not that we should "like" Borat or empathize with him, but what he reveals about those who come in contact with him.  You can learn the most about someone when they're outside their comfort zone, no longer to rely on their manners and forced to "wing it," and this film has amazing scenes of people reacting to Borat as if he's not joking.  The point isn't that he tricked them, it's what these people do and say in reaction.

We saw #14, 4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days , a few months ago and it was both grim and difficult, somewhat documentary in style, and very memorable.  This kind of bitter and harsh story, when told in a realistic way as it is here, is really the sort of thing I don't blame some people for wanting to avoid... sort of the way I've avoided United 93 on this list.

The Lives of Others has been near the top of my Netflix queue for some times and for whatever reason I keep bumping other things above it.  I guess it's time to check this one out finally.

Hadn't heard of This is England or Downfall before this list.

Several of my recent favorites are in this part of the list.  Donnie Darko, Let the Right One In, Brokeback Mountain and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mine are all fantastic and I'm especially glad to see the first two rising up in a sort of cult status of late.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Wayne Higgins on November 11, 2009, 11:52:59 AM
Ok, so I forgot to mention Dark Water.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 11, 2009, 11:58:41 AM
btw
has anyone seen Departures?  I haven't found it on dvd yet.

This one?
http://www.amazon.com/Departures-Toru-Minegishi/dp/B002SF9YNO (http://www.amazon.com/Departures-Toru-Minegishi/dp/B002SF9YNO)
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 11, 2009, 12:03:16 PM
Ok, so I forgot to mention Dark Water.

Forgot to mention it as in to say you really like it, or that you think it should be on the best 100 films of the decade list?

I haven't seen it (though I usually like Jennifer Connelly) but the consensus of reviewers both professional and amateur is not good:

http://www.metacritic.com/film/titles/darkwater (http://www.metacritic.com/film/titles/darkwater)

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/dark_water/ (http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/dark_water/)

We all have our guilty pleasures, though!   :)
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Wayne Higgins on November 11, 2009, 12:08:13 PM
yep

btw, while we're talking about movie greats...http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091111/ap_en_mo/us_oscars_roger_corman
Roger Corman is getting an honorary Oscar.  The Pit and the Pendulum is one of my all time favorites.  Who can forget such masterpieces like Big Bad Mama and Rock and Roll High School.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 11, 2009, 12:13:24 PM
Ignore the spammer... I banned him and deleted his message, in case some of you viewing this topic were wondering.  Pretty brave spammer.  Most of them lie low and don't attract attention to their spammy links!
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: LNerell on November 12, 2009, 10:23:43 AM
I would say based upon their top ten list this decade pretty much sucked for films. I've seen most of the films they list and enjoyed most of them, but I would have to say I can't think of any other decade were any of those films would make the top 50.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 12, 2009, 10:35:24 AM
I would say this has been a pretty good decade overall.  Pan's Labyrinth, Donnie Darko, all 3 Lord of the Rings films, Chidlren of Men, Synecdoche New York, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, both Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive from David Lynch, the Diving Bell and the Butterfly, the rise of Pixar, and maybe the best decade for stupid comedies ever (thank you Steve Carrell, Judd Apatow, Sasha Baron Cohen, Will Farrell, and Napoleon Dynamite) have kept me pretty happy, film-wise.

One thing the decade has been short on is the kind of towering, serious dramas that loom over future "best of all time" lists, like the Godfather and Raging Bull and that sort of thing.

Disappointments for me this decade have been Scorsese's focus on less complex entertainments, Spielberg in general, and James Cameron's lack of activity.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: LNerell on November 12, 2009, 11:05:07 AM
Disappointments for me this decade have been Scorsese's focus on less complex entertainments, Spielberg in general, and James Cameron's lack of activity.

Well I thought Aquaman was the best thing Cameron ever did.  ;D

I agree with you to a degree, but I guess I was making more of a comment on their top ten then on the decade. I  think I have seen six or seven of those listed, and not one of them made me think it was one of the best of the year, let alone of the decade.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 12, 2009, 11:16:48 AM
I agree with you on that.  Any chance people will look back 50 years from now and say Team America: World Police was the 5th best film of this decade? 

I had to google your "James Cameron's Aquaman" reference BTW.  I'd like to watch Entourage at some point but I've never seen it.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: LNerell on November 12, 2009, 01:24:02 PM
I had to google your "James Cameron's Aquaman" reference BTW.  I'd like to watch Entourage at some point but I've never seen it.

I read an interview with James Cameron in the LA Times right after the "Aquaman" episodes were shown. He said that at one point he could have actually gotten Aquaman made, that's how serious that show is taken in the industry.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 12, 2009, 04:33:30 PM
Yet another installment of "Mike's comments on 10 movies from that big, long list."

Quote
30 Irreversible (Gaspar Noé, 2002)
Yes, this scandalous revenge drama boasts a vile nine-minute rape sequence and a hideous opening mutilation. But it’s also a moral movie that refuses to sanction violence and remains, for strong stomachs at least, unforgettable.

29 Being John Malkovich (Spike Jonze, 2000)
The film that introduced the surreal genius of writer Charlie Kaufman to the world, this endlessly inventive riff on the nature of identity and celebrity is a milestone in moviemaking.

28 The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)
The true story of Elle editor Jean-Dominique Bauby who, after a stroke, was left paralysed and able to communicate only through blinking his left eye. The film takes us inside Bauby's wrecked body and charms us with his still rebellious wit.

27 Sideways (Alexander Payne, 2004)
A sozzled road trip in Californian wine country leads to a mid-life crisis for divorced failed writer and wine buff Miles (Paul Giametti), best man to sleazy charmer Jack (Thomas Haden Church).

26 Minority Report (Steven Spielberg, 2002)
A pinnacle for Spielberg and star Tom Cruise, this near-future sci-fi depicts a world of psychic crime- stoppers but is rooted in old fashioned film noir.

25 Dancer in the Dark (Lars Von Trier, 2000)
This musical melodrama was as emotionally subtle as a coach load of orphans and kittens driving off a cliff — and yet there was something about the florid excesses that gelled perfectly with star Bjork's heart-wrenching score.

24 28 Days Later... (Danny Boyle, 2002)
Danny Boyle and Beach novelist Alex Garland re-imagine the zombie movie for the 21st century. Here, the zombies move with lightning speed, and are fuelled not by the dark arts but by rage itself.

23 Man On Wire (James Marsh, 2008)
This lyrical documentary tells the story of Philippe Petit, who strung a wire between the twin towers of the World Trade Centre and danced on it, for no reason other than to create something beautiful for the people far below.

22 Far from Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002)
The social facades of 1950s Connecticut slowly crack apart in a gorgeous Technicolor-style melodrama. Julianne Moore is riveting as the homemaker whose life is upended by her husband’s homosexuality and her own feelings for gardener Dennis Haysbert.

21 Good Night, and Good Luck (George Clooney, 2005)
This ode to a past era of challenging TV journalism is authentic down to the last swirl of late-night cigarette smoke. David Strathairn impresses as Edward R. Murrow, the television journalist locking horns with Senator Joseph McCarthy.


For me, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly is the one that stands out on this segment of the list.  Not an easy film, but unbelievably powerful, and beautiful.

I just realized, this may be the only 10-film segment of the list of which I've seen 9 -- I've never seen Irreversible but have always wanted to.

Man On Wire is another one of those I'd recommend strongly even to people who have various excuses why they don't believe they'd like it.  I have zero interest in tightrope walking, so the idea of a documentary about a guy who wanted to tightrope walk between the towers of the World Trade Center may seem pointless... but this is  the most incredible example of "just keep working toward your insane goal and you may surprise everyone by actually getting there" a story I can think of.

The rest of these ten strike me as good films, maybe even borderline great (I think Sideways in particular is a lot of fun and I can see myself re-watching that every 5-10 years or so) but I wouldn't want most of these so near the top of a "100 best of decade" list.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Blackinfinity on November 12, 2009, 06:01:40 PM
Songs from the second floor  should be at number one.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: judd stephens on November 27, 2009, 03:45:29 PM
http://movies.yahoo.com/news/movies.reuters.com/top-10-movie-flops-decade-reuters

Above is a list of the 10 biggest flops of the decade.  They mention something about Catwoman and how the saying goes that female superheroes never seem to catch on.  I guess that's true.  

Come to think of it there are good movies where women become the heroes.... but they weren't super-heroes to begin with.  The classic example of course is Alien and its sequel with Sigourney Weaver.  Azumi is another one that comes to mind of a Japanese samurai/assassin young woman (cool movie too).  La Femme Nikita is another great one.

Maybe it's because in those movies the women start out really vulnerable, or maybe even stay that way, but persist in spite of it all, and that's why we appreciate it.  Maybe too with superheroes we prefer a "paternal figure" saving the planet... in the aforementioned female hero-movies, they're just saving themselves or their immediate group.  I wonder...

Yeah, maybe this is true.  The female hero overcomes a lot of obstacles which we respect.  She's not saving us though.  That would be too much for us to take.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Wayne Higgins on November 28, 2009, 06:15:20 AM
All joking aside...
I watch a lot of movies, that's all I watch.  I don't have cable or a dish, just a ever growing collection of DVD's.  I don't want to sound prejeduced, but this is a list by British writers, which have different opinions about moies than me, a Floridian may have.  Also, it's not 2010 yet.  The list is a bit premature.  For example, it's compiled before "Where the Wild Things Are".  Not that WTWTA is the best of the decade, but my point is wait until the decade is over before you start making a list about it.

 (If I haven't seen it, I don't comment on it)
20 Donnie Darko* Haven't seen it
19 United 93* Haven't seen it, and I don't want to.
18 Let the Right One In* Haven't seen it
17 Brokeback Mountain *Very good movie, quite groundbreaking.  Too bad the brookback backlash was California's anti-gay amendment.
16 Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind*Fun to watch, but top 20?
15 Downfall* I agree with every word they say about this one.
14 4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days* Haven't seen it
13 This Is England* Haven't seen it, but what a suprise.
12 The Lives of Others *Haven't seen it
11 Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan*Boring.
10 Hunger * Haven't seen it
9 The Queen*  Of course they like this one, they're British.  It's quite good, but any movie with a considerable amount of stock footage always goes in to the "Ed Wood catagory" for me.
8 Casino Royale*  I hate f*cking James Bond movies.  The very idea of a British tough guy is ludicrous.
7 The Last King of Scotland*  Excellent, Forest Whitaker's performance is outstanding.  But I can only watch it once.
6 Slumdog Millionaire*  Excellent.
5 Team America: World Police* Puppet show, funny, vulgar, not one of the top five. 
4 Grizzly Man*Herzog is a master, and this movie is no exception.  If you are looking for a movie about a nature lover, this isn't it.  It's a study in delusions of grandure.
3 No Country for Old Men*   Excellent.  Deserved the  Best picture Oscar.
2 The Bourne Supremacy / The Bourne Ultimatum * #2?!?!?  Please!  It's good, but not that good.
1 Hidden (Cache)*  Haven't seen it

I'll be back...
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Brian Bieniowski on November 28, 2009, 07:14:15 AM
8 Casino Royale*  I hate f*cking James Bond movies.  The very idea of a British tough guy is ludicrous.

They ass-whupped half the world into submission and had the greatest army and navy for over a century.  And I wouldn't want to get in a street tussle with either of the Kray Bros.  Those guys were scary.   :'(

That said, I always imagined James Bond to be less of a thug than Daniel Craig.  Not too crazy about the new Bond flicks.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: judd stephens on November 28, 2009, 07:27:56 PM
Jason Statham (Transporter, Crank, etc.) is pretty convincing as a tough Brit.

I wasn't sure who the Fray bros. were so I looked it up... I thought maybe they were the two albino dreadlocked twins from The Matrix Reloaded  :P
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: APK on November 28, 2009, 08:26:15 PM
The Brits don't really have a tradition of over-blown hollywood or comic book super
heroes, or gangsters. Their tough guys tend to be a bit more down to earth.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Seren on November 29, 2009, 10:32:37 AM
 The very idea of a British tough guy is ludicrous.

Thats fighting talk that is..... ;D I'd say come here and say that, but I am not a tough guy ;D

Apart from managing to live in the wilds of Scotland in Kilts during winter, there is the SAS.

I'm not a military supporter, but the idea of 3 guys jumping out of an airplane and only two wearing parachutes  - to build trust - takes a lot of balls.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 29, 2009, 10:48:18 AM
The US military wouldn't even have Special Force divisions if it weren't for help from the SAS and SBS (or whatever SBS used to be callled).  "The very idea of a British tough guy is ludicrous" only makes sense if the only British people you're familiar with are Prince Charles, Duran Duran, Monty Python, and The Beatles.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Seren on November 30, 2009, 11:06:08 AM
I'm not a royalist, but I have to give Charles some credit for sticking to his organic and nature viewpoints, despite the crap hes got for it - takes some courage too....and the global warming issue is slowly catchinghim up.....

Not sure how I'd cope with being king in waiting and never throwing a strop, always being impeccable in the duty, mind-fuck.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: mgriffin on November 30, 2009, 11:19:18 AM
What is throwing a strop?  Sort of like having a cow or pulling a Britney?  ;) 

I'd say he wigged out a little, not-too-discreetly cheating on his very famous and very popular wife.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Wayne Higgins on November 30, 2009, 02:52:00 PM
MOVIES!!! I meant MOVIES!!!
Jees, leave a comment up for a few days and  :o
(Good thing I didn't say the Brits are a bunch of bleedin' poofs! ::)
good thing "Yulees Gold" wasn't on the list.  Being that the piece of trash was made around here, I would have had a field day ragging on the people of Wakulla County, that they'ld probably come find me and lynch me.
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Seren on November 30, 2009, 02:53:03 PM
What is throwing a strop?  Sort of like having a cow or pulling a Britney?  ;)  

I'd say he wigged out a little, not-too-discreetly cheating on his very famous and very popular wife.

Sounds like the same thing....yeah, the Princess Diana thing, I'd agree with that, though I suspect there are many sides, generally unkown, to that story.

What I do know is that Princess Diana carried the ancient welsh royal bloodlines so Harry and William really are Welsh Princes. And it's important to remember that GB, prior to recent christianisiation, has a huge history of goddess worship, something I think still sits in the Land - but this might be another thread...... ;D

Hi Wayne - your post appeared while I was replying to Mike..... 8)
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Wayne Higgins on November 30, 2009, 02:54:23 PM
I still hate f*cking James Bond!
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d3/Aston.db5.coupe.300pix.jpg)
...but I do like the cars!
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Seren on November 30, 2009, 02:55:57 PM
I still hate f*cking James Bond!
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d3/Aston.db5.coupe.300pix.jpg)
...but I do like the cars!

Yes - Nice cars - shame about the role model!
Title: Re: The 100 Best Films of the Decade
Post by: Wayne Higgins on November 30, 2009, 02:57:05 PM
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/cc/OHMSSTracyBond.jpg)
"On Her Majesty's Secret Service"  Dianna Rigg is the best!